Daily Women's Health Policy Report

  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
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Daily Women's Health Policy Report by the National Partnership for Women & Families
Updated: 9 min 11 sec ago

Video Round Up: N.C. Gov. To Break Campaign Promise on Abortion Bills, Advocates Urge Delay on Fla. Antiabortion-Rights Measure

Fri, 06/05/2015 - 16:11

In today's clips, AP/ABC News 11's Ed Crump discusses how North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory (R) will break his campaign pledge to not sign any abortion restrictions if he signs a 72-hour mandatory delay bill into law. Elsewhere, FCN News shares Planned Parenthood's proposal that Florida Gov. Rick Scott (R) test the requirements of a proposed 24-hour mandatory delay bill himself before signing the measure.

Video Round Up: N.C. Gov. To Break Campaign Promise on Abortion Bills, Advocates Urge Delay on Fla. Antiabortion-Rights Measure

June 5, 2015 — In today's clips, AP/ABC News 11's Ed Crump discusses how North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory (R) will break his campaign pledge to not sign any abortion restrictions if he signs a 72-hour mandatory delay bill into law. Elsewhere, FCN News shares Planned Parenthood's proposal that Florida Gov. Rick Scott (R) test the requirements of a proposed 24-hour mandatory delay bill himself before signing the measure.



In an update on several pieces of legislation in North Carolina, AP/ABC News 11's Ed Crump touches on North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory's (R) announcement that he will not veto a 72-hour mandatory delay bill (HB 465) approved by the state Legislature on Wednesday.

According to Crump, abortion-rights supporters "had hoped [McCrory's] campaign promise to avoid restrictive abortion legislation would mean he would veto this bill." However, he notes that McCrory on Wednesday "issued a statement saying he was pleased with the way the legislation was written and would allow it to become law" (Crump, AP/ABC News 11, 6/4).




FCN News discusses Planned Parenthood's suggestion that Florida Gov. Rick Scott (R) visit a physician 24 hours before deciding whether to sign a proposed measure (HB 633) that would impose such a requirement on women seeking abortion care.

Barbara Zdravecky, CEO at Planned Parenthood of Southwest and Central Florida, says the legislation "really introduces shaming and coercing and judging a woman," adding, "I think the governor should understand that" (FCN News, 5/29).




KOAA News' Jessi Mitchell describes challenges facing the Pueblo, Colo., health department after the state Legislature rejected a bill (HB 15-1194) that would have helped fund a statewide program that helps improve access to long-acting reversible contraception among low-income women.

Lynn Procell, director of Community Health Services in Pueblo, says, "Locally, we are worried that that might give us a ... spike in teen pregnancy rates, and it has a large impact, not only the cost of the delivery, but then what supports does that teen mom need." Procell notes the state is speaking with private foundations about funding the program, while her own organization is "brainstorming to see what [it] can do to continue" providing LARC (Mitchell, KOAA News, 5/27).


Blogs Comment on Increasing Length of Mandatory Delays, Importance of ACA Contraceptive Coverage, More

Fri, 06/05/2015 - 16:06

Read the week's best commentaries from bloggers at the Center for American Rights' "ThinkProgress," Salon and more.

Blogs Comment on Increasing Length of Mandatory Delays, Importance of ACA Contraceptive Coverage, More

June 5, 2015 — Read the week's best commentaries from bloggers at the Center for American Rights' "ThinkProgress," Salon and more.

ABORTION RESTRICTIONS: "Women Are Being Forced To Wait Longer and Longer To Get an Abortion," Tara Culp-Ressler, Center for American Progress' "ThinkProgress": "Among the new abortion restrictions being imposed by [conservative] legislatures this session, a clear trend is emerging: New laws that significantly lengthen the period that women must wait before they're allowed to proceed with an abortion," Culp-Ressler writes. She notes that "[d]ozens of states have already enacted" 24-hour mandatory delays, "but now, lawmakers in several states are working to make the requirement even more stringent, lengthening their [mandatory delays] to force patients to wait multiple days." According to Culp-Ressler, state legislators in Arkansas, Oklahoma, Missouri, North Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee and Utah all have moved to impose mandatory delay periods longer than 24 hours. Culp-Ressler quotes Elizabeth Nash, senior state issues associate at the Guttmacher Institute, who said states are extending mandatory delays because they implemented "a record-breaking number of abortion restrictions" last year and now are trying "'to make them more burdensome'" (Culp-Ressler, "ThinkProgress," Center for American Progress, 6/4).

What others are saying about abortion restrictions:

~ "Doctors Challenge Unscientific Abortion Laws That Force Them To Practice Bad Medicine," Culp-Ressler, Center for American Progress' "ThinkProgress."

~ "Why Is Arizona Forcing Doctors To Lie to Women Who Need Abortions?" Andrew Beck, American Civil Liberties Union's "Speak Freely."

CONTRACEPTION: "Hey Insurance Companies: By Not Covering Contraception, You're Boosting Unintended Pregnancies," Jenny Kutner, Salon: Kutner writes that under the Affordable Care Act (PL 111-148), contraceptives are supposed to be available through individuals' health insurance plans at no cost but, "[u]nfortunately, that hasn't played out in practice." She writes, "In response to a number of insurance companies deciding to flout the [ACA]'s contraceptive coverage mandate, the Obama administration recently had to remind insurers that they are required to provide full coverage for all [FDA-approved] forms of female contraception, without co-pays or cost-sharing, and not just some types of birth control. Because when they don't, women get pregnant." According to Kutner, the logic "makes sense," because "[w]hen women can't access contraception, they face higher rates of unintended pregnancies (and, subsequently, the need for abortion care increases too)." Further, a recent article in The Conversation found that when insurers "fail to comply with ACA guidelines, they make women less likely to choose contraceptive methods such as intrauterine devices, which have significantly higher rates of efficacy at a much greater cost," Kutner notes. However, she writes that "with the Obama administration putting insurers on notice, the accessibility of low-to-no-cost birth control should increase -- and the rates of unintended pregnancy and abortion should go down" (Kutner, Salon, 6/2).

ABORTION PROVIDERS: "Honoring Dr. George Tiller," Julie Burkart, Huffington Post blogs: Burkhart, executive director of Trust Women, discusses the continued harassment abortion providers face by commemorating her "hero and mentor -- Dr. George Tiller -- [who] was assassinated in his church for providing a compassionate and safe place for women seeking abortions" six years ago. Burkhart explains that the "harassment of the doctors and staff who work at [abortion] clinics does not stop" at protests, noting that abortion-rights opponents "routinely circulate the home addresses and personal information of abortion providers, even going so far as to post 'WANTED'-style posters that include this private information." Noting that "Tiller was a solutions-oriented person," Burkhart says that on the anniversary of his death, she is "focusing on solutions to the consistent threats that abortion providers face." She urges "the Department of Justice to aggressively pursue the extremists who harass, stalk and murder abortion providers and their staff" and calls on "[l]ocal law enforcement [to] also take a proactive approach to protecting the clinics in their communities" (Burkhart, Huffington Post blogs, 6/2).

ABORTION STIGMA: "8 Things Not To Say to a Woman Who Had an Abortion," Mehera Bonner, Cosmopolitan: Bonner writes that she "frequently" raises the topic that she has had an abortion as part of an effort to "'normalize' the topic," but she notes that "[d]espite [her] own willingness" to discuss her abortion, "there are certain things not to say to someone who's had the procedure." For example, she notes that questions about guilt make an assumption that women who have had an abortion "have something to feel guilty about -- which they absolutely don't." Bonner also notes that questions about a partner's opinion on a woman's abortion can be inappropriate because the decision to have an abortion is a woman's "own decision about [her] own body." She addresses several other inappropriate questions, such as queries about adoption as an alternative -- which, she explains, "implies that adoption is a better way of dealing with an [unintended] pregnancy than abortion" -- and whether it was "weird" to view an ultrasound prior to the procedure, to which she responds, "Yes ... One more reason women shouldn't be made to look at their sonograms pre-procedure" (Bonner, Cosmopolitan, 6/2).

What others are saying about abortion stigma:

~ "Why This Woman Believes in the Power of Sharing Your Abortion Story," Nina Wolpow, Refinery 29.


Arizona Providers Sue To Block Antiabortion-Rights Law

Fri, 06/05/2015 - 15:44

The American Civil Liberties Union on Thursday filed a lawsuit in federal court on behalf of Arizona abortion providers against a state law (SB 1318) that, if it takes effect, will require physicians to share medically unproven information with patients seeking medication abortions, among other abortion restrictions, the Huffington Post reports.

Arizona Providers Sue To Block Antiabortion-Rights Law

June 5, 2015 — The American Civil Liberties Union on Thursday filed a lawsuit in federal court on behalf of Arizona abortion providers against a state law (SB 1318) that, if it takes effect, will require physicians to share medically unproven information with patients seeking medication abortions, among other abortion restrictions, the Huffington Post reports (Bellware, Huffington Post, 6/4).

The law is set to take effect July 3 (Beard Rau, Arizona Republic, 6/4).

Law Details

The law will require physicians to tell women the medically unproven statement that administering high doses of progesterone could reverse a medication abortion.

In addition, the law will bar women in the state from purchasing health plans that include abortion coverage on the Affordable Care Act's (PL 111-148) insurance marketplace. The restrictions do not apply to pregnancies resulting from rape or incest, or when a pregnancy threatens a woman's life.

The law also will require that physicians provide documentation to the state Department of Health Services showing that they have hospital admitting privileges. The records will not be made available to the public (Women's Health Policy Report, 3/31).

Details of Lawsuit

The plaintiffs -- Planned Parenthood Arizona and several other Arizona providers -- are requesting that the U.S. District Court for the District of Arizona block the law from going into effect because of the medication abortion provision. According to the lawsuit, the measure violates physicians' rights under the First Amendment by requiring them, "unwillingly and against their best medical judgment," to convey "a state-mandated message that is neither medically nor scientifically supported" (Huffington Post, 6/4).

In addition, the suit argues that the law violates patients' rights under the 14th Amendment because it requires them to receive "false, misleading and/or irrelevant information."

Comments

The Center for Arizona Policy -- the antiabortion-rights group that pushed for the law -- said it was "confident" the law would be upheld in court (Arizona Republic, 6/4).

Meanwhile, Ilana Addis, chair of the Arizona chapter of the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, on Thursday said there is not credible medical evidence to support the law's claim that medication abortions can be reversed (Huffington Post, 6/4).

Similarly, Planned Parenthood Federation of America President Cecile Richards said, "This reckless law forces doctors to lie to their patients, and it puts women's health at risk" (Van Velzer/Christie, AP/San Diego Union-Tribune, 6/4).

According to David Brown, staff attorney for the Center for Reproductive Rights, the law "may result in women beginning the [abortion] process before they're totally ready because they think it can be reversed" (Huffington Post, 6/4).

Dan Pochoda, senior counsel at the American Civil Liberties Union of Arizona, said, "This clearly reveals the goal here ... is to increase the burdens on being able to get an abortion with the clear goal from [abortion-rights opponents] to abolish the ability to get an abortion at all" (Arizona Republic, 6/4).


Wis. Senate Committee Advances 20-Week Ban; Assembly Approval Unclear

Fri, 06/05/2015 - 15:08

The Wisconsin Senate Committee on Health and Human Services on Thursday voted 3-2 to advance a bill (S 179) that would ban abortions at 20 weeks of pregnancy, and state Senate leaders have said the full chamber will likely vote on Tuesday to pass the measure, the AP/Minneapolis Star Tribune reports.

Wis. Senate Committee Advances 20-Week Ban; Assembly Approval Unclear

June 5, 2015 — The Wisconsin Senate Committee on Health and Human Services on Thursday voted 3-2 to advance a bill (S 179) that would ban abortions at 20 weeks of pregnancy, and state Senate leaders have said the full chamber will likely vote on Tuesday to pass the measure, the AP/Minneapolis Star Tribune reports.

Meanwhile, the legislation's prospects in the state Assembly remain unclear. Gov. Scott Walker (R) has said he will sign the bill if it is passed by the state Legislature (Ferguson, AP/Minneapolis Star Tribune, 6/4).

Current state law bans abortion after fetal viability, which is estimated to be at about 24 weeks.

Bill Details

The legislation, proposed in the state Senate and Assembly (AB 237), is based on the unfounded notion that a fetus can feel pain at that point of development. The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists has said there is no legitimate scientific evidence showing that fetuses are capable of feeling pain at 20 weeks.

Physicians who violate the ban could face felony charges, fines of up to $10,000 and potential jail time of up to three years and six months. In addition, a woman who received an abortion after 20 weeks could sue the physician who performed the abortion for damages. The man involved in the pregnancy would also be allowed to sue the physician, except in cases in which the pregnancy was the result of rape or incest.

Further, the bill would require physicians to tell women the probable post-fertilization age of the fetus and estimate the probability of the fetus surviving outside of the womb. It would also require doctors to tell women that perinatal hospice care is available for infants who are expected to live short lives. State law already requires physicians to tell women seeking abortions the fetus' likely gestational age in writing and orally.

The measure includes exceptions for cases of medical emergencies but does not clearly define the term. Currently, it does not allow for exemptions in cases of rape and incest (Women's Health Policy Report, 6/3).

Amendment Rejected

State Sen. Leah Vukmir (R), chair of the Wisconsin Senate Health and Human Services Committee, rejected an amendment that would have prioritized the woman's care during an emergency. Vukmir said the existing state law on abortion care provides adequate information about treating a woman and fetus in an emergency situation (AP/Minneapolis Star Tribune, 6/4).

State Sen. Jon Erpenbach (D), who proposed the amendment, said, "[I]t is very clear on this legislation that it is all about the fetus. And the protections we have in law, when it comes to the life of the [woman], are at great risk" (Beckett, Wisconsin Radio Network, 6/4).

Assembly Prospects

The Assembly Committee on Health has not yet scheduled a vote on the bill, according to the AP/Star Tribune (AP/Minneapolis Star Tribune, 6/4).

Assembly Speaker Robin Vos (R) on Wednesday said the Assembly will wait to see the state Senate's final bill before determining whether to bring the bill up for a vote (Wisconsin Radio Network, 6/4). Further, Vos said the Assembly does not intend to be in session in June, except to discuss the state budget, and that his caucus has yet to discuss the 20-week ban legislation (AP/Minneapolis Star Tribune, 6/4).


Several States Increasing Mandatory Delays Before Abortion

Fri, 06/05/2015 - 14:41

Several states in recent years have passed legislation extending the mandatory delay period before women can have an abortion, NPR's "It's All Politics" reports.

Several States Increasing Mandatory Delays Before Abortion

June 5, 2015 — Several states in recent years have passed legislation extending the mandatory delay period before women can have an abortion, NPR's "It's All Politics" reports.

States Move To Impose, Extend Mandatory Delays

According to "It's All Politics," 26 states currently have mandatory delay periods of at least 24 hours. However, several state legislatures this year have approved measures to extend those delays to 48 or 72 hours.

For example, a new Arkansas law (Act 1086), introduced by state Rep. Robin Lundstrum (R), will extend the state's mandatory delay period to 48 hours and require women to receive in-person counseling before they can have an abortion. Meanwhile, Florida Rep. Jennifer Sullivan (R) sponsored a bill (HB 633) that would implement a 24-hour waiting period in the state, claiming that the measure would give women more time to reflect on their decision.

Abortion-Rights Supporters Voice Concerns

Elizabeth Nash, senior state issues associate at the Guttmacher Institute, said of the mandatory delay extensions, "Now so many states have so many restrictions, really the only thing left to do is go back to the restrictions that are in place and see how much worse they can be."

Meanwhile, Mona Reis -- who directs Presidential Women's Center, an abortion clinic in South Florida -- said, "For me, having been involved with this since 1973, it was easier to get an abortion at that time than it is 42 years later."

Reis explained that most women who come into her clinic already receive private counseling before an abortion and have already thought through their decision. She added that making women visit a clinic twice to receive an abortion imposes additional hardships on them, particularly for women who have children. Specifically, she said such women would have "to arrange to find child care for [their] children, and arrange to take off extra time from work to satisfy this mandatory delay which makes no medical sense at all."

Further, Reis noted that the mandatory delay bill would also impose additional burdens on abortion clinics, given that many clinics only have physicians on site a few days each week. Under the proposed requirements, clinics would also need to schedule physicians for in-person counseling sessions (Ludden, "It's All Politics," NPR, 6/2).


Ala. Senate Committee Approves Bill Restricting Zoning of Abortion Clinics

Fri, 06/05/2015 - 14:38

The Alabama Senate Health and Human Services Committee on Wednesday voted 6-1 to approve a bill (HB 527) that would ban abortion clinics within 2,000 feet of public schools, the AP/Oklahoman reports.

Ala. Senate Committee Approves Bill Restricting Zoning of Abortion Clinics

June 5, 2015 — The Alabama Senate Health and Human Services Committee on Wednesday voted 6-1 to approve a bill (HB 527) that would ban abortion clinics within 2,000 feet of public schools, the AP/Oklahoman reports.

According to the AP/Oklahoman, the bill could have difficultly passing the state Senate, as the full chamber only has through the end of the legislative session on Friday to approve the measure. In addition, if the state Senate alters the bill, it would have to return to the state House for another vote (AP/Oklahoman, 6/3).

Bill Details

The bill, filed by state Rep. Ed Henry (R), would prohibit the state Department of Public Health from issuing or renewing health center licenses to abortion clinics that do not meet the minimum distance requirement.

The state House added two amendments to the bill, including one that removed language that would have applied the zoning requirement to all reproductive health centers. The other amendment specifies that the rule would apply only to public school buildings currently in operation and not to those that have been abandoned.

The bill aims to close the Alabama Women's Center in Huntsville, which is the sole abortion facility in Northern Alabama. Henry last week rejected an amendment that would have grandfathered the Huntsville clinic (Women's Health Policy Report, 5/28).

Abortion-Rights Supporters Voice Objections

Dalton Johnson, owner of the Alabama Women's Center, expressed concerns that the bill could become a "never-ending thing." She said, "There's a school, day care, church, library, pretty much on every corner of America. So that's what they'll be doing, just upping and saying next will be you can't be within 2,000 feet of a library. You can't be 2,000 feet of a church." Meanwhile, Susan Watson, executive director at the American Civil Liberties Union of Alabama, said her organization will file suit against the measure if it is enacted. "It's not right to pass legislation to close an existing business just because you don't like it," she said (AP/Oklahoman, 6/3).


Calif. Assembly Advances Measure To Boost Comprehensive Sexuality Education

Thu, 06/04/2015 - 19:30

The California Assembly on Tuesday voted 47-24 to advance a bill (AB 329) that would revise the state's curriculum requirements for sexuality education, the AP/Washington Times reports.

Calif. Assembly Advances Measure To Boost Comprehensive Sexuality Education

June 4, 2015 — The California Assembly on Tuesday voted 47-24 to advance a bill (AB 329) that would revise the state's curriculum requirements for sexuality education, the AP/Washington Times reports.

The bill now heads to the state Senate for consideration.

Bill Details

The measure, sponsored by Assembly member Shirley Weber (D), would require that schools combine the mandated HIV/AIDS prevention education provided for students in grades seven through 12 with their voluntary sexuality education programs.

Specifically, the bill would require that schools provide additional information to students about same-sex relationships and sexually transmitted infections during the mandatory HIV/AIDS prevention classes. Weber has noted that California's sexuality education courses are out of date and frequently make LGBT students feel excluded.

According to the AP/Times, students' parents would be able to opt their children out of the classes. However, districts would not be allowed to implement measures that require students to opt into such classes (AP/Washington Times, 6/2).


D.C. Council Approves Bill To Allow Pharmacies To Dispense Year's Worth of Contraceptives

Thu, 06/04/2015 - 19:30

The Washington, D.C., City Council on Tuesday gave final approval to legislation that would require health plans in the District to authorize pharmacies to dispense up to a one-year supply of contraceptives at one time, the Washington Post reports.

D.C. Council Approves Bill To Allow Pharmacies To Dispense Year's Worth of Contraceptives

June 4, 2015 — The Washington, D.C., City Council on Tuesday gave final approval to legislation that would require health plans in the District to authorize pharmacies to dispense up to a one-year supply of contraceptives at one time, the Washington Post reports.

The proposal now heads to the District's mayor for consideration. If approved, the legislation also must withstand a 30-day review period before Congress.

Bill Details

The measure would require that Medicaid and private insurers permit pharmacies to dispense enough contraceptives at one time to last women a full year. Currently, pharmacies in the District are permitted to dispense three months' worth of contraceptives at a time.

According to the Post, the proposed regulation would not affect coverage premiums. In addition, the proposal would not prohibit providers from prescribing one-month supplies of contraceptives if they are concerned about the method's safety or efficacy for certain patients.

Debate on the Measure

City Council officials hope the proposed change would help to reduce the incidence of unintended pregnancies in the District by increasing access to contraception, the Post reports. Specifically, D.C. Council Health and Human Services Committee Chair Yvette Alexander (D) said, "We want to do everything we can" to reduce teenage pregnancy in the District.

In addition, according to the Post, supporters of the legislation said the bill would help reduce barriers to contraception, especially for women in underserved areas. During a hearing on the bill, Noah Mamber, the public and legislative affairs manager at Planned Parenthood of Metropolitan Washington Action Fund, said, "Nearly half of women using oral birth control receive only [one] month of pills at each appointment. This creates a serious barrier to care for women who lack convenient access to a pharmacy or health center that dispenses contraception."

Meanwhile, critics of the legislation claim that individuals might not know how to properly store contraceptives for an entire year or that a year's supply could be a disincentive for women to regularly see their health care providers (Stein, Washington Post, 6/2).


N.C. Legislature Approves 72-Hour Mandatory Delay Bill; Governor Plans To Sign Measure

Thu, 06/04/2015 - 19:30

The North Carolina Assembly on Wednesday voted 71-43 to pass a bill (HB 465) that would extend the state's mandatory delay before an abortion from 24 to 72 hours, the Raleigh News & Observer reports.

N.C. Legislature Approves 72-Hour Mandatory Delay Bill; Governor Plans To Sign Measure

June 4, 2015 — The North Carolina Assembly on Wednesday voted 71-43 to pass a bill (HB 465) that would extend the state's mandatory delay before an abortion from 24 to 72 hours, the Raleigh News & Observer reports.

The measure now heads to Gov. Pat McCrory (R), who on Wednesday said he will sign the legislation (Campbell, Raleigh News & Observer, 6/3). If enacted, North Carolina would join several other states with 72-hour mandatory delays, including Missouri, South Dakota and Utah. Meanwhile, Oklahoma passed a 72-hour mandatory delay law (HB 1409) that is scheduled to take effect in November (Drew, AP/ABC News, 6/3).

Bill Details

In addition to the mandatory delay, the North Carolina bill would allow doctors to refuse to perform abortions if they have ethical, moral or religious objections to the procedure. The measure also would institute additional reporting requirements for providers.

Specifically, the measure would require physicians to provide the state Department of Health and Human Services with information about abortions performed after the 16th week of pregnancy. Further, the bill would require additional documentation for abortions performed after 20 weeks' gestation to demonstrate that continuing the pregnancy would have threatened the woman's life or substantially impaired her health. The state prohibits abortion after 20 weeks in other circumstances.

In addition, the state Senate amended HB 465 to require annual inspections of clinics and ambulatory surgical centers that perform abortions. Further, the measure would mandate that no one under age 18 would be allowed to be employed by such providers.

State senators also approved an amendment that changed the bill's requirement that abortion can only be performed by ob-gyns. Under the amendment, physicians with "sufficient training" in "miscarriage management" and abortion care would be allowed to perform the procedures.

Further, the state Senate amended the bill to include provisions that increase restrictions on sex offenders and add protections for survivors of domestic violence. The chamber also added language that would alter the state's definition of statutory rape to make it easier for individuals to collect payments for child support (Women's Health Policy Report, 6/3).

Reaction

Sarah Preston, acting executive director of American Civil Liberties Union of North Carolina, voiced objections to the bill, saying, "A woman is more than capable of taking the time she needs to make her own personal medical decisions without the government forcing her to endure an unnecessary and potentially harmful delay" (Burns, "@NCCapitol," WRAL, 6/3).

Separately, State Rep. Rick Glazier (D) said the measure would make it more difficult for women to get an abortion. "Will there be fewer abortions? Hardly -- they'll simply occur elsewhere, in the back alleys and dark rooms," he said (Raleigh News & Observer, 6/3).

Meanwhile, prior to McCrory's announcement, NARAL Pro-Choice North Carolina and Planned Parenthood noted that signing the bill would break his promise to voters (AP/ABC News, 6/3). McCrory during his 2012 gubernatorial campaign said he would not approve any additional abortion restrictions if elected (Raleigh News & Observer, 6/3).

Alison Kiser, senior director of communications at Planned Parenthood South Atlantic, said, "Going back on his word by allowing these new restrictions to become law would represent a fundamental betrayal of voters' trust" (AP/ABC News, 6/3). According to the News & Observer, Planned Parenthood planned to bring petitions against the bill with 16,000 signatures to McCrory's office on Thursday (Raleigh News & Observer, 6/3).


Ore. Senate, House Advance Measures To Improve Contraceptive Access

Thu, 06/04/2015 - 19:30

The Oregon Senate on Tuesday unanimously voted to approve a bill (HB 3343) that would require insurers to cover a 12 months' supply of contraception at a time, KMTR News reports.

Ore. Senate, House Advance Measures To Improve Contraceptive Access

June 4, 2015 — The Oregon Senate on Tuesday unanimously voted to approve a bill (HB 3343) that would require insurers to cover a 12 months' supply of contraception at a time, KMTR News reports.

The bill now heads to Gov. Kate Brown (D). According to KMTR News, if Brown signs the measure, the state would become the first in the U.S. in which insurers must cover one year's worth of contraception in a single batch.

Comments

Mary Nolan, interim executive director at Planned Parenthood Advocates of Oregon, called the measure "the most significant leap forward for reducing unintended pregnancies in a generation." According to KMTR News, PPAO has noted that providing birth control in a 12-month supply, compared with 30- or 90-day supplies, is linked to a 30% reduction in the risk of unintended pregnancy.

Meanwhile, state Sen. Elizabeth Steiner Hayward (D) said, "Ensuring that women have access to 12 continuous months of birth control will improve consistent use and better serve women juggling demanding schedules" (KMTR News, 6/2).

Ore. House Advances Contraception Prescribing Measure

In related news, the Oregon House on Tuesday voted 50-10 to advance a bill (HB 2879) that would permit women to obtain contraception without a prescription from a physician, The Oregonian reports (Theriault, The Oregonian, 6/2).

Legislation Details

The measure would authorize pharmacists to prescribe and dispense birth control directly to women.

State Rep. Knute Buehler (R), who introduced the legislation, initially proposed it as an amendment (HB 2028-5) to a bill (HB 2028) that addressed pharmacists' scope of practice. However, the proposal was rejected, and the measure was assigned to a workgroup (Women's Health Policy Report, 5/29). According to The Oregonian, the legislation was brought back as HB 2879, which previously served as a placeholder bill.

The latest version of the measure includes two substantive revisions from Buehler's original legislation. Under the new version, a pharmacist can prescribe birth control to a woman under age 18 if contraception previously has been prescribed to her by a traditional provider. In addition, the revised version does not include language that explicitly permits pharmacists to cite religious or ethical objections for refusing to fill a prescription. Pharmacists in Oregon already have such rights under the state's general pharmacy rules, Buehler noted.

Buehler said, "As a doctor, I think birth control should be as easy and accessible as possible." He added, "It makes no sense that men have unrestrained access to contraception" while women do not (The Oregonian, 6/2).


Colo. Officials Pledge Family Planning Program Will Continue

Thu, 06/04/2015 - 16:53

Health officials in Colorado have said a state program providing long-acting reversible contraceptives to low-income women will continue despite funding concerns, the Colorado Springs Gazette reports.

Colo. Officials Pledge Family Planning Program Will Continue

June 2, 2015 — Health officials in Colorado have said a state program providing long-acting reversible contraceptives to low-income women will continue despite funding concerns, the Colorado Springs Gazette reports (Schrader, Colorado Springs Gazette, 5/30).

Background

The Colorado Family Planning Initiative offers no- or low-cost LARCs, such as intrauterine devices and hormonal implants, to low-income women at 68 clinics throughout the state. The initiative was established as a five-year pilot program through a $25 million private donation. In May, a Colorado Senate committee killed a measure (HB 15-1194) that would have provided $5 million in funding to continue the program (Women's Health Policy Report, 5/4).The private donation funding is slated to run out this year (Colorado Springs Gazette, 5/30).

The initiative has provided more than 30,000 IUDs and other LARC methods to low-income, uninsured or underinsured Colorado women. Since the initiative began, the state's teen birth rate has decreased by 40%. Meanwhile, the abortion rate among teens has decreased by 34%, according to Larry Wolk, Colorado's chief medical officer and executive director of the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment.

Further, in that period, the state has saved about $23 million from averted Medicaid costs associated with birth. Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment officials have predicted the program could save the state up to $40 million in Medicaid costs that would otherwise go toward pre- and postnatal care (Women's Health Policy Report, 5/4).

Program Will Continue

Wolk last week pledged that the program would remain in place. "We're going to continue the program, first and foremost," he said.

He added, "The $5 million that we were seeking in general fund (dollars) was to really help supplement the existing program." Wolk said the program would capitalize on existing resources absent the $5 million in funding. Further, he noted that he has met with in-state and out-of state foundations and that it is likely that additional funding will be available for fiscal year 2015-2016.

Meanwhile, Dan Martindale, director of El Paso County Public Health, said the department has made plans for what to do in the case that funding ends. He said, "We've learned to be very flexible and resilient." He added, "There are several different things that we can do should there be no more donor funding in a year or two."

State Lawmaker Affirms Support for Program

State Rep. KC Becker (D), who sponsored the bill to fund the program, said the state should be involved with programs, such as the LARC initiative, that reduce poverty and save millions of dollars. "It is absolutely an important role for the state to be working toward those goals," she said. IUDs can cost $800 to $1,000 for uninsured or underinsured women.

According to Becker, there will be a discussion of whether to introduce another program funding bill next year (Colorado Springs Gazette, 5/30).


Ore. Senate, House Advance Measures To Improve Contraceptive Access

Thu, 06/04/2015 - 16:53

The Oregon Senate on Tuesday unanimously voted to approve a bill (HB 3343) that would require insurers to cover a 12 months' supply of contraception at a time, KMTR News reports.

Ore. Senate, House Advance Measures To Improve Contraceptive Access

June 4, 2015 — The Oregon Senate on Tuesday unanimously voted to approve a bill (HB 3343) that would require insurers to cover a 12 months' supply of contraception at a time, KMTR News reports.

The bill now heads to Gov. Kate Brown (D). According to KMTR News, if Brown signs the measure, the state would become the first in the U.S. in which insurers must cover one year's worth of contraception in a single batch.

Comments

Mary Nolan, interim executive director at Planned Parenthood Advocates of Oregon, called the measure "the most significant leap forward for reducing unintended pregnancies in a generation." According to KMTR News, PPAO has noted that providing birth control in a 12-month supply, compared with 30- or 90-day supplies, is linked to a 30% reduction in the risk of unintended pregnancy.

Meanwhile, state Sen. Elizabeth Steiner Hayward (D) said, "Ensuring that women have access to 12 continuous months of birth control will improve consistent use and better serve women juggling demanding schedules" (KMTR News, 6/2).

Ore. House Advances Contraception Prescribing Measure

In related news, the Oregon House on Tuesday voted 50-10 to advance a bill (HB 2879) that would permit women to obtain contraception without a prescription from a physician, The Oregonian reports (Theriault, The Oregonian, 6/2).

Legislation Details

The measure would authorize pharmacists to prescribe and dispense birth control directly to women.

State Rep. Knute Buehler (R), who introduced the legislation, initially proposed it as an amendment (HB 2028-5) to a bill (HB 2028) that addressed pharmacists' scope of practice. However, the proposal was rejected, and the measure was assigned to a workgroup (Women's Health Policy Report, 5/29). According to The Oregonian, the legislation was brought back as HB 2879, which previously served as a placeholder bill.

The latest version of the measure includes two substantive revisions from Buehler's original legislation. Under the new version, a pharmacist can prescribe birth control to a woman under age 18 if contraception previously has been prescribed to her by a traditional provider. In addition, the revised version does not include language that explicitly permits pharmacists to cite religious or ethical objections for refusing to fill a prescription. Pharmacists in Oregon already have such rights under the state's general pharmacy rules, Buehler noted.

Buehler said, "As a doctor, I think birth control should be as easy and accessible as possible." He added, "It makes no sense that men have unrestrained access to contraception" while women do not (The Oregonian, 6/2).


N.C. Legislature Approves 72-Hour Mandatory Delay Bill; Governor Plans To Sign Measure

Thu, 06/04/2015 - 16:52

The North Carolina Assembly on Wednesday voted 71-43 to pass a bill (HB 465) that would extend the state's mandatory delay before an abortion from 24 to 72 hours, the Raleigh News & Observer reports.

N.C. Legislature Approves 72-Hour Mandatory Delay Bill; Governor Plans To Sign Measure

June 4, 2015 — The North Carolina Assembly on Wednesday voted 71-43 to pass a bill (HB 465) that would extend the state's mandatory delay before an abortion from 24 to 72 hours, the Raleigh News & Observer reports.

The measure now heads to Gov. Pat McCrory (R), who on Wednesday said he will sign the legislation (Campbell, Raleigh News & Observer, 6/3). If enacted, North Carolina would join several other states with 72-hour mandatory delays, including Missouri, South Dakota and Utah. Meanwhile, Oklahoma passed a 72-hour mandatory delay law (HB 1409) that is scheduled to take effect in November (Drew, AP/ABC News, 6/3).

Bill Details

In addition to the mandatory delay, the North Carolina bill would allow doctors to refuse to perform abortions if they have ethical, moral or religious objections to the procedure. The measure also would institute additional reporting requirements for providers.

Specifically, the measure would require physicians to provide the state Department of Health and Human Services with information about abortions performed after the 16th week of pregnancy. Further, the bill would require additional documentation for abortions performed after 20 weeks' gestation to demonstrate that continuing the pregnancy would have threatened the woman's life or substantially impaired her health. The state prohibits abortion after 20 weeks in other circumstances.

In addition, the state Senate amended HB 465 to require annual inspections of clinics and ambulatory surgical centers that perform abortions. Further, the measure would mandate that no one under age 18 would be allowed to be employed by such providers.

State senators also approved an amendment that changed the bill's requirement that abortion can only be performed by ob-gyns. Under the amendment, physicians with "sufficient training" in "miscarriage management" and abortion care would be allowed to perform the procedures.

Further, the state Senate amended the bill to include provisions that increase restrictions on sex offenders and add protections for survivors of domestic violence. The chamber also added language that would alter the state's definition of statutory rape to make it easier for individuals to collect payments for child support (Women's Health Policy Report, 6/3).

Reaction

Sarah Preston, acting executive director of American Civil Liberties Union of North Carolina, voiced objections to the bill, saying, "A woman is more than capable of taking the time she needs to make her own personal medical decisions without the government forcing her to endure an unnecessary and potentially harmful delay" (Burns, "@NCCapitol," WRAL, 6/3).

Separately, State Rep. Rick Glazier (D) said the measure would make it more difficult for women to get an abortion. "Will there be fewer abortions? Hardly -- they'll simply occur elsewhere, in the back alleys and dark rooms," he said (Raleigh News & Observer, 6/3).

Meanwhile, prior to McCrory's announcement, NARAL Pro-Choice North Carolina and Planned Parenthood noted that signing the bill would break his promise to voters (AP/ABC News, 6/3). McCrory during his 2012 gubernatorial campaign said he would not approve any additional abortion restrictions if elected (Raleigh News & Observer, 6/3).

Alison Kiser, senior director of communications at Planned Parenthood South Atlantic, said, "Going back on his word by allowing these new restrictions to become law would represent a fundamental betrayal of voters' trust" (AP/ABC News, 6/3). According to the News & Observer, Planned Parenthood planned to bring petitions against the bill with 16,000 signatures to McCrory's office on Thursday (Raleigh News & Observer, 6/3).


Texas Bill Sends Additional Parental Involvement Law Restrictions to Governor

Thu, 06/04/2015 - 16:51

The Texas House on Friday voted 102-43 to approve changes made by the state Senate to a bill (HB 3994) that would tighten a state law permitting pregnant minors to obtain a court's permission to have an abortion instead of obtaining parental consent for the procedure, the Texas Tribune reports.

Texas Bill Sends Additional Parental Involvement Law Restrictions to Governor

June 2, 2015 — The Texas House on Friday voted 102-43 to approve changes made by the state Senate to a bill (HB 3994) that would tighten a state law permitting pregnant minors to obtain a court's permission to have an abortion instead of obtaining parental consent for the procedure, the Texas Tribune reports.

The bill now heads to Gov. Greg Abbott (R) for consideration. According to the Tribune, Abbott likely will sign the bill into law (Ura, Texas Tribune, 5/29).

Background

Currently, minors can apply for a judicial bypass in any Texas county. Minors seeking judicial bypass must prove at least one of three grounds: that they are well-informed and mature enough to obtain an abortion without parental notification; that it is not in their best interests to notify their parents of the procedure; or that notifying their parents would cause emotional, physical or sexual abuse.

HB 3994 would require minors to apply for bypass in their county of residence, an adjacent county if their home county has fewer than 10,000 residents or in the county in which they plan to have the procedure. In addition, the bill would increase the burden of proof that minors face when claiming that obtaining parental consent for abortion would lead to emotional, physical or sexual abuse.

Currently, judges are required to rule on such petitions within two days, at which time the request is considered approved absent a judge's ruling. Under HB 3994, a judge would be required to rule on a minor's request within five days (Women's Health Policy Report, 5/26). The measure was amended to remove a provision stating that if the judge does not rule in that timeframe, the request is automatically denied. The amended bill does not provide any guidance for what happens if a ruling is not issued (Enlow, Houston Press, 5/29).

The bill was amended so that a judge is required to rule on a minor's request within five days (Women's Health Policy Report, 5/26). The measure was amended further to remove a provision stating that if the judge does not rule in that timeframe, the request is automatically denied (Houston Press, 5/29). Currently, judges are required to rule on such petitions within two days, at which time the request is considered approved absent a judge's ruling.

In addition, the state Senate amended the bill's provision that would have required physicians to presume women were minors until they provided government-issued identification showing otherwise. Under the new language, physicians still would be required to assume pregnant women are minors and request they show proof of identification. However, physicians would be allowed to provide abortion without a woman providing an ID. In such cases, physicians would be required to provide a report to the state on the abortion (Women's Health Policy Report, 5/26).

The state Senate also amended the measure to allow for civil penalties of up to $10,000 for any individual found to have "intentionally, knowingly, recklessly or with gross negligence" violated the measure (Texas Tribune, 5/29).

Some State Lawmakers Note Potential Legal Issues

Some state lawmakers who support abortion rights expressed concern that certain changes to the measure would not withstand potential legal challenges. Specifically, the lawmakers noted that changing the judicial review period from two to five days might go against Supreme Court precedent that requires states to provide judicial bypass laws that allow eligible minors to access abortion care "expeditious[ly]" and "effective[ly]."

Further, state Rep. Ina Minjarez (D) said the time it would take for minors to appeal a denied judicial bypass request or a subsequent appeals court's denial of the request could take months. Such a delay could put minors' health, safety and ability to access abortion at risk, Minjarez said.

Similarly, state Sen. Kirk Watson (D) said that the bill remaining silent on whether a bypass petition is approved or denied absent a judge's ruling could be as problematic as an automatic denial. "In essence, the judge can bypass the judicial bypass by simply not ruling," he said (Houston Press, 5/29).


Providers File Suit Against Kansas Law Banning Certain Abortions

Thu, 06/04/2015 - 16:51

The Center for Reproductive Rights on Monday filed a lawsuit on behalf of two physicians in state court against a Kansas law (SB 95) that bans physicians from performing a certain abortion procedure, AP/ABC News reports.

Providers File Suit Against Kansas Law Banning Certain Abortions

June 2, 2015 — The Center for Reproductive Rights on Monday filed a lawsuit on behalf of two physicians in state court against a Kansas law (SB 95) that bans physicians from performing a certain abortion procedure, AP/ABC News reports (Hegeman, AP/ABC News, 6/1).

According to Reuters, the court has not yet scheduled a hearing (Bailey, Reuters, 6/1).

Law Details

The law, which was drafted by the National Right to Life Committee and takes effect July 1, will permit exceptions only if continuing the pregnancy would result in a woman's death or the irreversible physical impairment of a major bodily function. The law does not include exceptions for cases of incest or rape. It also does not include an exception if a woman is experiencing mental health issues (Women's Health Policy Report, 4/29).

Details of Lawsuit

CRR filed the lawsuit in Shawnee County District Court on behalf of Herbert Hodes and Traci Nauser, ob-gyns at the Center for Women's Health in Overland Park, Kansas (AP/ABC News, 6/1). Their clinic is one of only three abortion facilities in the state (Reuters, 6/1). The lawsuit asks the district court to block implementation of the law and to declare it unconstitutional.

The providers contend that, under the law, doctors would be forced to change their manner of providing abortion care, resulting in practices that increase the complexity of abortions and the health risks to women. Specifically, the lawsuit states that the law is "an affront both to patients' right to be free from unnecessary medical procedures and physicians' ability to act in what they believe is the best interests of their patients and in accordance with their ethical obligations."

Comments

CRR President and CEO Nancy Northup in a statement said, "We are confident this court will see the harm this law would inflict upon Kansas women and block it before even one woman is denied the care that she and her doctor have decided is best."

Meanwhile, the office of Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt (R) said it would defend the ban in court (AP/ABC News, 6/1). Schmidt in April told the state Legislature that it could cost the state up to $450,000 to defend the law (Women's Health Policy Report, 4/29).


SCOTUS To Announce Whether it Will Consider Miss., N.C. Abortion Restrictions

Thu, 06/04/2015 - 16:51

The Supreme Court soon will decide whether to take up one of two possible cases involving state abortion restrictions, the Los Angeles Times reports.

SCOTUS To Announce Whether it Will Consider Miss., N.C. Abortion Restrictions

June 1, 2015 — The Supreme Court soon will decide whether to take up one of two possible cases involving state abortion restrictions, the Los Angeles Times reports.

According to the Times, one of the cases involves an admitting privileges requirement (HB 1390) in Mississippi, while the other involves a North Carolina law (SL 2011-405) mandating certain ultrasound requirements before an abortion.

States led by conservative lawmakers since 2010 have passed a spate of abortion regulations, many of which have been blocked or overturned by federal courts, the Times reports. The high court so far has refused to consider any of those challenges.

Mississippi Lawsuit

According to the Times, the Supreme Court justices will announce in the next few weeks whether they will consider the Mississippi law, which threatens to shut down the state's sole abortion clinic (Savage, Los Angeles Times, 5/29).

The law requires that physicians performing abortions in Mississippi have admitting privileges at nearby hospitals. The physicians at Jackson Women's Health Organization sought admitting privileges at multiple hospitals but were denied, prompting the state to order the clinic to close for violating the law.

In July 2014, a three-judge panel of the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled in a 2-1 decision that the law would have illegally shifted Mississippi's constitutional obligations to other states by eliminating abortion access inside the state. The ruling did not overturn the law or assess whether the admitting privileges requirement is a justified safety measure. Rather, the ruling preserved an existing stay against the law and left the lower courts to consider the measure under the now-clarified principle of state responsibility.

In August 2014, Mississippi's attorney general asked the full 5th Circuit to review the panel's ruling. The full circuit declined to do so in November 2014, meaning the law remains on hold for now and JWHO can remain open while the underlying lawsuit proceeds.

Mississippi Attorney General Jim Hood (D) in February asked the Supreme Court to review the 5th Circuit's decision. In April, attorneys representing JWHO filed a brief asking the Supreme Court to dismiss the state's case in defending the law (Women's Health Policy Report, 4/24).

North Carolina Lawsuit

Meanwhile, according to the Times, the justices could announce whether they will consider the North Carolina case by mid-June (Los Angeles Times, 5/29).

The law requires physicians to perform ultrasounds and display and describe the images to women seeking abortions, even if the women object. The requirement has never taken effect because of ongoing court challenges, although other provisions of the law remain in place.

Last year, a three-judge panel of the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals unanimously upheld a lower court's ruling that struck down the narrated ultrasound requirement, stating that the provision is an unconstitutional violation of physicians' free-speech rights.

In March, North Carolina requested that the Supreme Court consider the 4th Circuit's decision (Women's Health Policy Report, 3/24).

Implications

According to the Times, a Supreme Court decision not to hear the Mississippi or North Carolina cases would be a win for abortion-rights supporters, who argue that stringent abortion restrictions implemented in conservative states are intended to hinder abortion access.

Meanwhile, attorneys in both North Carolina and Mississippi have argued that the high court should weigh in on the laws and clarify which regulations constitute an "undue burden" on women seeking abortion (Los Angeles Times, 5/29).


Blogs Comment on Overturned Ark. Abortion Ban, Suspect Claims Driven by Antiabortion-Rights Ideology, More

Thu, 06/04/2015 - 16:47

Read the week's best commentaries from bloggers at the Center for American Progress' "ThinkProgress," RH Reality Check and more.

Blogs Comment on Overturned Ark. Abortion Ban, Suspect Claims Driven by Antiabortion-Rights Ideology, More

May 29, 2015 — Read the week's best commentaries from bloggers at the Center for American Progress' "ThinkProgress," RH Reality Check and more.

ABORTION RESTRICTIONS: "One of the Strictest Abortion Bans in the Country Was Just Stopped in its Tracks," Tara Culp-Ressler, Center for American Progress' "ThinkProgress": The U.S. Court of Appeals for the 8th Circuit struck down parts of an Arkansas law (Act 301) that banned abortion "after just 12 weeks of pregnancy, " which is "significantly before the point of viability that serves as the current cut-off point for legal abortion services under Roe v. Wade," Culp-Ressler writes. According to Culp-Ressler, state lawmakers in 2013 "overrode their governor to approve the 12-week ban -- which, at the time, represented the strictest abortion ban that had ever passed on the state level," although it was "quickly surpassed" when North Dakota "approv[ed] a six-week ban [HB 1456] later that year." She adds that the Arkansas law "has never been allowed to take effect" because a federal judge "blocked, and later permanently struck [it] down," but "state lawmakers have continued to appeal those decisions." Meanwhile, she notes that Arkansas officials have "found plenty of other ways to impede residents' access to" abortion. She writes, "This spring, the Arkansas legislature led the nation in the number of abortion restrictions proposed on the state level," advancing legislation "stripping funding from Planned Parenthood, toughening requirements for parental consent ... restricting the use of" medication abortion and "requir[ing] doctors to tell women about an unproven theory regarding 'abortion reversal,' effectively enshrining junk science into law" (Culp-Ressler, "ThinkProgress," Center for American Progress, 5/27).

What others are saying about abortion restrictions:

~ "Louisiana Lawmakers Clash as GOP Fails To Advance Anti-Choice Measure," Teddy Wilson, RH Reality Check.

~ "Texas Republicans Fall Short on Abortion Insurance Ban," Andrea Grimes, RH Reality Check.

ANTIABORTION-RIGHTS MOVEMENT: "Is Anti-Choice Ideology Driving Malpractice Lawsuits?" Byron Calhoun and the Phantom Fetal Skull," Imani Gandy, RH Reality Check: Gandy writes about how Byron Calhoun, an ob-gyn in West Virginia who is "known for promoting junk science ... to undermine access to abortion," helped to spur a malpractice lawsuit based on potentially false claims in an effort to "cast abortion in a negative light." She explains that Calhoun told a former patient, Itai Gravely, about a year after treating her for complications following an abortion that "he had found a 13-week old fetal skull in her uterus." Gandy says the information prompted Gravely to file a lawsuit, but "[t]he pathology report which was conducted after her treatment ... established that there was no fetal skull present in Gravely's uterus" and a judge dismissed all of Gravely's claims. Gandy writes, "Based on the evidence, it's hard to avoid a conclusion that Calhoun ... lied to Gravely, dragging the young woman and her most personal information into a bitter public fight over abortion care, using her as a prop in his own ideological campaign." Further, noting how the discredited lawsuit was timed to capitalize on abortion-rights opponents' reaction to the Kermit Gosnell trial, Gandy also points out how, since Gravely's lawsuit was filed, "anti-choice legislators in West Virginia have stepped up their efforts by introducing more than 30 regressive laws, even overriding Gov. [Earl] Tomblin's [D] veto to pass a 20-week abortion ban [HB 2568] that is flatly unconstitutional" (Gandy, RH Reality Check, 5/26).

What others are saying about the antiabortion-rights movement:

~ "What Was the Worst State for Women This Week?" Amanda Marcotte, Slate's "The XX Factor."

CPCs: "California Lawmakers Vote To Make it Harder for Crisis Pregnancy Centers To Lie to Women," Jenny Kutner, Salon: California's Assembly on Tuesday voted 49-26 to approve a bill (AB 775) that would "require crisis pregnancy centers to stop actively misleading women" by "mak[ing] it more difficult for CPCs to use traditional tactics (such as straight-up lying) to prevent women from terminating their pregnancies," Kutner writes. She explains that the measure would "requir[e] centers that do not have medical licenses to disclose that they do not have medical licenses" and "also requir[e] that licensed medical facilities ... 'notify patients that the state has programs that offer free or affordable abortion services, as well as help with family planning and prenatal care.'" Kutner notes that a NARAL Pro-Choice investigation has found that California's CPCs "routinely and purposely lie to clients about their pregnancy options," adding that the proposed legislation, "which now heads to the California Senate, would require that non-medical facilities make clear they cannot provide medical counseling, and help women learn about all options -- whether they decide to terminate their pregnancies or not" (Kutner, Salon, 5/27).

ABORTION-RIGHTS MOVEMENT: "Texas Abortion Provider Launches Program To 'Shift' Abortion Stigma: A Q&A With Amy Hagstrom Miller and Amanda Williams," Grimes, RH Reality Check: Grimes interviews Amy Hagstrom Miller -- founder of a new not-for-profit called Shift and former CEO of the Texas-based Whole Woman's Health, an abortion clinic that closed in the wake of one of the state's antiabortion-rights measures (HB 2) -- and Amanda Williams, Shift's program manager, to learn "about their vision for Shift, why they've chosen to launch in Texas, and what the end of abortion stigma might look like in [conservative] states." In the interview, Hagstrom Miller explains that Shift is an organization "'working to strategically shift the stigma around abortion in our culture'" and that it is "'committed to fostering open and honest conversations, lifting up all communities, and advocating for reproductive freedom.'" According to Hagstrom Miller and Williams, Shift will focus on efforts such as bringing "'advocates, patients, and providers together in a statewide way,'" launching "'billboards or some web campaigns that'" advertise abortion resources and helping to address areas in crisis because of abortion clinic closures in the state, Grimes writes (Grimes, RH Reality Check, 5/27).

CONTRACEPTION: "Colorado Is Shuttering the Birth Control Initiative That Made it A National Leader & Here's What 5 Horrified Health Professionals Have To Say," Lauren Holter, Bustle: "Despite being an obvious success, the ... Colorado Senate voted to end the Colorado Family Planning Initiative (CFPI) in late April, which provided free or reduced long-term birth control, like [intrauterine devices] and implants, to low-income women," Holter writes. She explains that since the program launched "in 2009, Colorado's teen pregnancy rate dropped 40 percent and the teen abortion rate fell 35 percent, which saved the state money in healthcare for teen moms and food programs for low-income parents" and "made Colorado a national leader in family planning." However, "the 68 clinics across the state that used the program's funds to provide birth control for low-income women [now] are scrambling to find other sources of money to sustain the initiative," she writes, noting that if they are unable to do so, "Colorado will take a major step backwards on family planning." Holter cites the dismayed responses of several health care providers and women's health leaders, including Eric Ferrero, vice president for communications at Planned Parenthood Federation of America, and Susan Levy, executive director of the Boulder Valley Women's Health Center, where the initiative first launched. For example, in one such response, Holter cites Liz Romer, director of Adolescent Family Planning at Children's Hospital Colorado, who criticized the decision, pointing out that lawmakers "'can't be against abortion and contraception at the same time'" (Holter, Bustle, 5/29).

What others are saying about contraception:

~ "Republicans Are Pushing for OTC Birth Control, and That's a Bad Thing," Robin Marty, Care2.

TEEN PREGNANCY: "Can You Design a Teen Pregnancy Prevention Campaign That Does Not Shame Young Mothers, Insult Low-Income People ... And Oh Yeah, and Is Not Racist?" Jamille Fields, Law Students for Reproductive Justice's "Repo Repro": Fields writes about how many teen pregnancy prevention campaigns -- which are "really touted" during Teen Pregnancy Prevention Month in May -- are problematic because they "sham[e] teen mothers" and "exclud[e] men from any role in" reproductive decision-making, among other issues. She stresses that "[i]t is important to empower -- not shame -- all young adults to take charge of their reproductive decision-making." Fields provides several recommendations for improving teen pregnancy prevention campaigns, such as providing teenagers "with evidence-based and comprehensive sexuality education in schools and ... a space for one-on-one discussions about sexual health in medical providers' offices." She also recommends that teenagers "be made aware that their health insurance plan may have to cover contraceptives" at no cost and that "any discussions around sexual health and pregnancy prevention ... be addressed to young men, just as equally as it does to women," as well as to LGBT youth (Fields, "Repo Repro," LSRJ, 5/28).


Op-Ed Debunks Justifications for 20-Week Abortion Bans

Thu, 06/04/2015 - 16:44

The "idea of fetal pain is just the latest way the pro-life lobby is trying to reduce access to abortion," columnist Latoya Peterson writes in a Fusion opinion piece, citing a 20-week abortion ban recently proposed in Wisconsin.

Op-Ed Debunks Justifications for 20-Week Abortion Bans

May 29, 2015 — The "idea of fetal pain is just the latest way the pro-life lobby is trying to reduce access to abortion," columnist Latoya Peterson writes in a Fusion opinion piece, citing a 20-week abortion ban recently proposed in Wisconsin.

Peterson notes that the 20-week ban was one of several pieces of antiabortion-rights legislation advanced over the Memorial Day weekend, joining a 20-week ban (HB 2568) that took effect in West Virginia, proposed clinic zoning restrictions (HB 527) in Alabama and parental involvement measures in Texas (HB 3994) and Nevada (AB 405). Further, she writes that conservative lawmakers did not move these bills "in the day light" but instead "rel[ied] on meetings conducted on a Sunday during [a] national holiday weekend, complicated riders and strategically excluding opponents from a late night vote."

Peterson explains that the 20-week bans "are justified by the sponsors of some of these bills basing their claims on misinterpreted research that says fetuses can feel pain after 20 weeks" and are written so as "to horrify and frighten voters into agreement." She writes, "For people who would term themselves pro-life, this shows a stunning lack of regard for the health of the woman -- physical and emotional -- now required to carry the pregnancy to term, regardless of the outcome or the [fetus'] lack of continued development."

According to Peterson, 20-week bans often burden women who, around that time of pregnancy, have discovered severe fetal anomalies, "complicat[ing] this already horrifying time with arbitrary rules designed to increase suffering." Further, she notes that conservative lawmakers simultaneously "attempt to challenge the shrinking number of doctors willing to even consider such a procedure" by "[i]ncreasing penalties and decreasing clinic access."

"By pandering to an increasingly fringe minority, who will take any symbolic victory against abortion and leave the bodies of women in their wake, extremist lawmakers are willing to ignore medical facts and statistics and hurt women to advance their cause," Peterson writes. She adds, "It's time to stop using abortion as a political football and acknowledge that shady political tactics are not providing more clarity, safety, or options for women and families in need" (Peterson, Fusion, 5/27).


Federal Appeals Court Overturns Idaho's 20-Week Abortion Ban, Other Abortion Restrictions

Thu, 06/04/2015 - 16:42

The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on Friday struck down two antiabortion-rights laws in Idaho, including a 20-week abortion ban and restrictions that require abortions performed during the second trimester to take place at a hospital, Reuters reports.

Federal Appeals Court Overturns Idaho's 20-Week Abortion Ban, Other Abortion Restrictions

June 1, 2015 — The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on Friday struck down two antiabortion-rights laws in Idaho, including a 20-week abortion ban and restrictions that require abortions performed during the second trimester to take place at a hospital, Reuters reports (Levine, Reuters, 5/29).

According to Reuters, lower court rulings on the legislation have prevented Idaho from enforcing either law (Reuters, 5/29). However, the Guttmacher Institute reports that 10 states currently have 20-week abortion bans. Further, the House recently approved such a ban (HR 36) (Sullivan, The Hill, 5/29).

Background

The case centered on Jennie McCormack, who was arrested in 2011 for ending her pregnancy at about 20 weeks by using abortion medication her sister obtained over the Internet. Mark Hiedeman, the prosecuting attorney for Bannock County, Idaho, filed felony charges against McCormack for violating a 1972 state law that says a physician must perform abortion care and that abortion in the second trimester must be performed in a hospital.

Although the charges were later dismissed, McCormack's attorney filed a lawsuit seeking to affirm that she has a right to take medication to induce an abortion and that physicians may prescribe the drugs. The suit also sought to block Idaho's 20-week abortion ban.

A federal judge granted McCormack a temporary injunction barring enforcement of the self-induced abortion statute, but he said she did not have standing to challenge the fetal pain law because she was no longer pregnant when it took effect.

In September 2012, a three-judge panel of the 9th Circuit affirmed the lower court. However, the panel said McCormack's lawyer -- a physician who joined the case as a co-plaintiff -- could still challenge the law (Women's Health Policy Report, 9/12/12).

Latest Ruling

In the ruling Friday, a three-judge panel of the 9th Circuit said Idaho's 20-week abortion ban violates the standard set in the 1992 Supreme Court case Planned Parenthood v. Casey, in which the justices ruled that abortion restrictions cannot impose an undue burden on women's ability to obtain an abortion before viability (The Hill, 5/29). Specifically, the judges ruled that the ban is "unconstitutional because it categorically bans some abortions before viability."

Similarly, the court said that the state's law requiring second-trimester abortions be performed at a hospital is unconstitutional "because it places an undue burden on a woman's ability to obtain an abortion." Further, the 9th Circuit found that other provisions in the hospital requirement law were "unconstitutionally vague," including a provision that mandates that abortions in the first trimester occur in medical facilities that are properly staffed (Chappell, "The Two-Way," NPR, 5/29).


Survey: Higher Percentage of U.S. Adults Say They Are 'Pro-Choice' Than 'Pro-Life'

Thu, 06/04/2015 - 16:41

For the first time in seven years, a higher percentage of U.S. adults identify as "pro-choice" than "pro-life," according to a new Gallup survey, The Hill reports.

Survey: Higher Percentage of U.S. Adults Say They Are 'Pro-Choice' Than 'Pro-Life'

June 1, 2015 — For the first time in seven years, a higher percentage of U.S. adults identify as "pro-choice" than "pro-life," according to a new Gallup survey, The Hill reports (Sullivan, The Hill, 5/29).

For the survey, researchers interviewed 1,024 U.S. adults by phone between May 6 and May 10 (Lerner, Politico, 5/29). According to The Hill, the Gallup poll did not provide definitions for the terms "pro-life" and "pro-choice" (The Hill, 5/29).

Key Findings

The survey found that 50% of U.S. residents describe themselves as pro-choice, including 46% of men and 54% of women (Politico, 5/29). In particular, the percentage of individuals between ages 35 and 55 who identify as pro-choice increased from 40% in 2012 to 52% in the latest Gallup survey (Kliff, Vox, 5/29). More than 50% of respondents younger than age 56 described themselves as pro-choice in the survey.

Meanwhile, 44% of survey respondents described themselves as pro-life, the lowest percentage in more than five years. Specifically, 47% of individuals ages 55 and up described themselves as pro-life (Politico, 5/29).

Overall, 29% of respondents to the new Gallup survey said abortion should be legal in all circumstances, while 13% said that abortion should be legal in "most" circumstances.

Meanwhile, 36% of respondents said abortion should be legal in a "few" circumstances, with 51% of individuals who identified as pro-life giving this response. Nineteen percent of respondents said abortion should not be legal in any circumstances (The Hill, 5/29).

Implications and Context

According to Politico, this survey marks the first time since 2008 that people identifying as pro-choice have outnumbered those identifying as pro-life to such a large degree. By contrast, a Gallup survey in 2012 found that the percentage of respondents who described themselves as pro-life outpaced those describing themselves as pro-choice by 9 percentage points (Politico, 5/29).

However, according to Vox, the pro-choice and pro-life terminology can be misleading. Separate polling has indicated that many U.S. residents prefer to identify as both pro-life and pro-choice or as neither rather than picking between pro-life or pro-choice. Further, more people tend to support abortion rights when polling questions are phrased to highlight the role of the woman in such decisions, Vox reports (Vox, 5/29).