Daily Women's Health Policy Report

  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
Syndicate content
Daily Women's Health Policy Report by the National Partnership for Women & Families
Updated: 1 hour 48 min ago

Featured Blogs

Fri, 08/28/2015 - 18:26

"Lawmakers Are Convinced That Women Are Having Abortions For The Wrong Reasons" (Culp-Ressler, "ThinkProgress," Center for American Progress, 8/25); "Catholic Hospital Caves Under Threat of Lawsuit and Approves Woman's Procedure" (Gill, "Speak Freely," American Civil Liberties Union, 8/25).

August 28, 2015

FEATURED BLOG

"Lawmakers Are Convinced That Women Are Having Abortions For The Wrong Reasons," Tara Culp-Ressler, Center for American Progress' "ThinkProgress": Lawmakers who oppose abortion rights "seek to restrict abortion from all angles" and "[n]ow, a new battleground is emerging: Anticipating why a woman may choose to have an abortion, and then outlawing ending a pregnancy for this particular reason," Culp-Ressler writes. For example, "first-of-its-kind legislation [HB 135] currently up for debate in Ohio would prohibit a woman from having an abortion because she found out her fetus has a Down syndrome diagnosis," she writes, adding that the measure likely will be approved this fall. According to Culp-Ressler, the bill -- like restrictions in other states "that prohibit women from ending a pregnancy based [on] the characteristics of her fetus," such as race or sex -- come from Americans United for Life, a group that writes antiabortion-rights model legislation and "shops [it] around to conservative lawmakers." Meanwhile, "[o]pponents of Ohio's proposed bill are expressing concern that it would position abortion doctors as gatekeepers, requiring them to determine whether their patient is seeking an abortion for a reason deemed acceptable by the state legislature," Culp-Ressler writes, noting that physicians who break the proposed law "could face felony charges, possible jail time, and the loss of their medical license." She adds that, according to abortion-rights supporters, such bills aim to "ultimately play into larger narratives about who is allowed to have an abortion" (Culp-Ressler, "ThinkProgress," Center for American Progress, 8/25).

What others are saying about the antiabortion-rights movement:

~ "Anti-Choice Group's Latest Video Misleads on 'Intact' Fetuses," Teddy Wilson, RH Reality Check.

~ "Planned Parenthood Fights to Keep Medicaid Funding in Louisiana," Jessica Mason Pieklo, RH Reality Check.

~ "How Anti-Abortion Activists Uncover Details About Women's Personal Medical Procedures," Culp-Ressler, Center for American Progress' "ThinkProgress."

FEATURED BLOG

"Catholic Hospital Caves Under Threat of Lawsuit and Approves Woman's Procedure," Elizabeth Gill, American Civil Liberties Union's "Speak Freely": "Under the threat of a potential lawsuit, a Catholic-affiliated hospital in California's largest hospital network made an unexpected move," authorizing "a previously denied doctor's request to perform a post-partum tubal ligation," Gill writes. Gill explains that Rachel Miller, a patient at Mercy Medical Center, decided she would like to have a tubal ligation "after she gives birth ... in late September." However, the hospital denied a request from Miller's physician to perform the procedure, noting that the hospital "operates under binding 'ethical and religious directives' issued by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops," which prohibits "sterilization for the purpose of contraception." According to Gill, the hospital "agreed to grant an exception" for Miller after ACLU submitted a letter warning of a possible lawsuit, but "there remains a clear conflict between the best interests of patients and the directives of the Catholic hospital system." Catholic hospitals in the U.S. "are increasingly ubiquitous ... and they are often the only health care option for women," Gill writes, adding, "[A]s long as Catholic hospitals are allowed to apply the ethical and religious directives, many women will be denied care because Catholic bishops are telling medical professionals how to operate" (Gill, "Speak Freely," American Civil Liberties Union, 8/25).

Colo. LARC Program Receives $2M in Temporary Funding

Fri, 08/28/2015 - 18:16

Several organizations have pledged a total of about $2 million to temporarily fund a Colorado program that helps low-income and uninsured women access long-acting reversible contraception, state officials announced on Tuesday, the Denver Post reports.

Colo. LARC Program Receives $2M in Temporary Funding

August 28, 2015 — Several organizations have pledged a total of about $2 million to temporarily fund a Colorado program that helps low-income and uninsured women access long-acting reversible contraception, state officials announced on Tuesday, the Denver Post reports (Paul, Denver Post, 8/25).

Program Details

The Colorado Family Planning Initiative offers no- or low-cost LARCs, such as intrauterine devices and hormonal implants, to low-income women at 68 clinics throughout the state. The initiative was established as a five-year pilot program through a private donation of about $25 million (Women's Health Policy Report, 7/8). The donation funding expired in July, and the program subsequently had longer waiting lists and was not able to offer as many services (Denver Post, 8/25).

The initiative has provided more than 30,000 IUDs and other LARC methods to low-income, uninsured or underinsured Colorado women. Since the initiative began, the state's teen birth rate has decreased by 40%. Meanwhile, the abortion rate among teens has decreased by 34%, according to Larry Wolk, Colorado's chief medical officer and executive director of the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment.

Further, in that period, the state has saved about $23 million from averted Medicaid costs associated with birth. CDPHE officials have predicted the program could save the state up to $40 million in Medicaid costs that would otherwise go toward pre- and postnatal care.

In May, a Colorado Senate committee killed a measure (HB 15-1194) that would have provided $5 million in funding to continue the program. However, state officials have said the program would remain in place (Women's Health Policy Report, 6/2).

Funding Details

More than a dozen organizations have pledged funding to help continue the program, the Post reports.

According to CDPHE, "With new funding from Colorado funders and foundations, the initiative will be able to continue training health care providers, educating women on contraceptive choices and subsidizing as many as 6,000 [IUDs] or implants."

Meanwhile, state health officials, with support from Gov. John Hickenlooper (D), said they will renew their efforts to get funding legislation approved next year (Denver Post, 8/25).


Alaska Judge Rejects Restrictions on Medicaid Abortion Coverage

Fri, 08/28/2015 - 18:14

An Alaska judge on Thursday ruled that a state law (SB 49) and several regulations limiting Medicaid coverage for abortion care are unconstitutional, 2KTUU reports.

Alaska Judge Rejects Restrictions on Medicaid Abortion Coverage

August 28, 2015 — An Alaska judge on Thursday ruled that a state law (SB 49) and several regulations limiting Medicaid coverage for abortion care are unconstitutional, 2KTUU reports (Carpenter, 2KTUU, 8/27).

Background

The law, signed last year, revised the state's definition of what constitutes a "medically necessary" abortion that is eligible for Medicaid coverage. The law defined an abortion as medically necessary if the pregnancy posed "serious risk to the life or physical health of a woman," including the risk of death, complications that could impair a major bodily function or one of 21 specified conditions, physical disorders or injuries.

The legislation was similar to the state regulations, issued in January 2014, that defined an abortion as medically necessary to preserve a woman's life or physical health and also when the procedure was necessary to protect a woman's mental health.

Planned Parenthood of the Great Northwest challenged the regulations but amended the lawsuit in May 2014 to incorporate the new state law. In July of last year, Superior Court Judge John Suddock blocked the state law while he considered PPGNW's lawsuit (Women's Health Policy Report, 7/16/14).

Latest Ruling

In his decision Thursday, Suddock struck down the law and regulations, ruling that both violated the state Constitution's equal protection clause.

He explained that an unintended pregnancy can be a crisis for any woman, but that the crisis "may be extreme" for low-income women without access to abortion.

Suddock also noted that Medicaid will pay $9,000 for routine prenatal care and $12,000 for routine delivery costs for pregnancies in which a low-income woman carries to term "in the face of significant risks." However, he noted that under the law, Medicaid "cannot pay $650 for the same poor woman who is unwilling to bear those risks and who exercises her constitutional right to terminate her pregnancy." He added, "The court is aware of no other context where Medicaid engages in such a relentlessly one-sided calculus."

According to the AP/Columbus Ledger-Enquirer, Suddock said the law "seeks to limit Medicaid funding to high-risk, high-hazard situations while failing to address serious but 'less-than-catastrophic' health detriments." Suddock noted that the law also would "deny funding in cases involving fetal anomalies" and for women dealing with mental illness or substance use disorders, the AP/Ledger-Enquirer reports.

Comments

PPGNW CEO Chris Charbonneau praised Suddock for "striking down these cruel restrictions on women's health and rights that violate the Alaska constitution." She said, "Every Alaskan woman, regardless of income, should be able to make the pregnancy decision that's best for herself and her family."

Meanwhile, Cori Mills, spokesperson for the state Department of Law, said the state was reviewing the ruling and would consider its options (Bohrer, AP/Columbus Ledger-Enquirer, 8/27).


Blogs Comment on Federal Contraceptive Coverage Rules, Lambast Ohio Antiabortion-Rights Law, More

Fri, 08/28/2015 - 16:09

Read the week's best commentaries from bloggers at the Center for American Progress' "ThinkProgress," American Civil Liberties Union's "Speak Freely" and more.

Blogs Comment on Federal Contraceptive Coverage Rules, Lambast Ohio Antiabortion-Rights Law, More

August 28, 2015 — Read the week's best commentaries from bloggers at the Center for American Progress' "ThinkProgress," American Civil Liberties Union's "Speak Freely" and more.

CONTRACEPTION: "Anti-Birth Control Employers Still Denying Women, Ignoring Obamacare Disclosure Requirements," Ian Millhiser, Center for American Progress' "ThinkProgress": Millhiser writes that the "real impact" of the Supreme Court's decision in Burwell v. Hobby Lobby "is still up in the air," noting that "the Supreme Court has thus far gone out of its way to ignore the unanimous consensus among federal appeals courts who say that employers must comply with the Obama administration's current rules." He explains that the Hobby Lobby decision "contained language strongly suggesting that an alternative method of ensuring that workers have access to birth control ... would survive Supreme Court review," and "[t]he Obama administration's current rules call the Supreme Court on this bluff, implementing the very same accommodation that the Hobby Lobby opinion implied to be legally acceptable." However, shortly after ruling on Hobby Lobby, "a majority of the Court granted temporary relief to a religious college that objected specifically to the fill-out-the-form accommodation in an order that remains in effect today," Millhiser writes. Similarly, he notes that the high court stayed a ruling from the 3rd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals that upheld the accommodation, while the 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals stayed its own ruling affirming the accommodation pending "the Supreme Court's final disposition of the case." Millhiser concludes, "Until the Supreme Court releases its hold over these cases, the unanimous consensus among federal courts of appeals means very little at all. It is also an ominous sign for supporters of reproductive health that they will have a harder fight ahead of them in the Supreme Court than they have thus far faced in the courts of appeal" (Millhiser, "ThinkProgress," Center for American Progress, 8/25).

ANTIABORTION-RIGHTS MOVEMENT: "Lawmakers Are Convinced That Women Are Having Abortions For The Wrong Reasons," Tara Culp-Ressler, Center for American Progress' "ThinkProgress": Lawmakers who oppose abortion rights "seek to restrict abortion from all angles" and "[n]ow, a new battleground is emerging: Anticipating why a woman may choose to have an abortion, and then outlawing ending a pregnancy for this particular reason," Culp-Ressler writes. For example, "first-of-its-kind legislation [HB 135] currently up for debate in Ohio would prohibit a woman from having an abortion because she found out her fetus has a Down syndrome diagnosis," she writes, adding that the measure likely will be approved this fall. According to Culp-Ressler, the bill -- like restrictions in other states "that prohibit women from ending a pregnancy based [on] the characteristics of her fetus," such as race or sex -- come from Americans United for Life, a group that writes antiabortion-rights model legislation and "shops [it] around to conservative lawmakers." Meanwhile, "[o]pponents of Ohio's proposed bill are expressing concern that it would position abortion doctors as gatekeepers, requiring them to determine whether their patient is seeking an abortion for a reason deemed acceptable by the state legislature," Culp-Ressler writes, noting that physicians who break the proposed law "could face felony charges, possible jail time, and the loss of their medical license." She adds that, according to abortion-rights supporters, such bills aim to "ultimately play into larger narratives about who is allowed to have an abortion" (Culp-Ressler, "ThinkProgress," Center for American Progress, 8/25).

What others are saying about the antiabortion-rights movement:

~ "Anti-Choice Group's Latest Video Misleads on 'Intact' Fetuses," Teddy Wilson, RH Reality Check.

~ "Planned Parenthood Fights to Keep Medicaid Funding in Louisiana," Jessica Mason Pieklo, RH Reality Check.

~ "How Anti-Abortion Activists Uncover Details About Women's Personal Medical Procedures," Culp-Ressler, Center for American Progress' "ThinkProgress."

ACCESS TO CARE: "Catholic Hospital Caves Under Threat of Lawsuit and Approves Woman's Procedure," Elizabeth Gill, American Civil Liberties Union's "Speak Freely": "Under the threat of a potential lawsuit, a Catholic-affiliated hospital in California's largest hospital network made an unexpected move," authorizing "a previously denied doctor's request to perform a post-partum tubal ligation," Gill writes. Gill explains that Rachel Miller, a patient at Mercy Medical Center, decided she would like to have a tubal ligation "after she gives birth ... in late September." However, the hospital denied a request from Miller's physician to perform the procedure, noting that the hospital "operates under binding 'ethical and religious directives' issued by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops," which prohibits "sterilization for the purpose of contraception." According to Gill, the hospital "agreed to grant an exception" for Miller after ACLU submitted a letter warning of a possible lawsuit, but "there remains a clear conflict between the best interests of patients and the directives of the Catholic hospital system." Catholic hospitals in the U.S. "are increasingly ubiquitous ... and they are often the only health care option for women," Gill writes, adding, "[A]s long as Catholic hospitals are allowed to apply the ethical and religious directives, many women will be denied care because Catholic bishops are telling medical professionals how to operate" (Gill, "Speak Freely," American Civil Liberties Union, 8/25).

ABORTION-RIGHTS MOVEMENT: "Even if You Haven't Had an Abortion, You Owe Planned Parenthood," Katha Pollitt, The Nation: Pollitt calls on men and women who have benefited from Planned Parenthood and other abortion clinics to express their support for the organization, citing the recent attacks on Planned Parenthood, legislation aimed at closing down "[i]ndependent clinics all over the country," and the harassment and stigma that can deter new providers from entering the field and prevent women from accessing care. Acknowledging that not all women can safely share their abortion story, Pollitt reiterates her call to "women for whom the stakes are nowhere near so high," writing, "Don't all political movements, at some level, ask people to get out of their comfort zones and be a little brave?" Further, not "only women who have had abortions have a responsibility here," Pollitt writes, adding, "If you or your child or your boyfriend (8 percent of Planned Parenthood's patients are men) ever visited a Planned Parenthood clinic for birth control or [sexually transmitted infections] treatment, you owe them," as does anyone who "ha[s] sex without intending pregnancy" or benefited from "postponing childbearing." She explains, "[U]ndergirding all of those choices is the ready availability of birth control and abortion" (Pollitt, The Nation, 8/27).


Alaska Judge Rejects Restrictions on Medicaid Abortion Coverage

Fri, 08/28/2015 - 15:32

An Alaska judge on Thursday ruled that a state law (SB 49) and several regulations limiting Medicaid coverage for abortion care are unconstitutional, 2KTUU reports.

Alaska Judge Rejects Restrictions on Medicaid Abortion Coverage

August 28, 2015 — An Alaska judge on Thursday ruled that a state law (SB 49) and several regulations limiting Medicaid coverage for abortion care are unconstitutional, 2KTUU reports (Carpenter, 2KTUU, 8/27).

Background

The law, signed last year, revised the state's definition of what constitutes a "medically necessary" abortion that is eligible for Medicaid coverage. The law defined an abortion as medically necessary if the pregnancy posed "serious risk to the life or physical health of a woman," including the risk of death, complications that could impair a major bodily function or one of 21 specified conditions, physical disorders or injuries.

The legislation was similar to the state regulations, issued in January 2014, that defined an abortion as medically necessary to preserve a woman's life or physical health and also when the procedure was necessary to protect a woman's mental health.

Planned Parenthood of the Great Northwest challenged the regulations but amended the lawsuit in May 2014 to incorporate the new state law. In July of last year, Superior Court Judge John Suddock blocked the state law while he considered PPGNW's lawsuit (Women's Health Policy Report, 7/16/14).

Latest Ruling

In his decision Thursday, Suddock struck down the law and regulations, ruling that both violated the state Constitution's equal protection clause.

He explained that an unintended pregnancy can be a crisis for any woman, but that the crisis "may be extreme" for low-income women without access to abortion.

Suddock also noted that Medicaid will pay $9,000 for routine prenatal care and $12,000 for routine delivery costs for pregnancies in which a low-income woman carries to term "in the face of significant risks." However, he noted that under the law, Medicaid "cannot pay $650 for the same poor woman who is unwilling to bear those risks and who exercises her constitutional right to terminate her pregnancy." He added, "The court is aware of no other context where Medicaid engages in such a relentlessly one-sided calculus."

According to the AP/Columbus Ledger-Enquirer, Suddock said the law "seeks to limit Medicaid funding to high-risk, high-hazard situations while failing to address serious but 'less-than-catastrophic' health detriments." Suddock noted that the law also would "deny funding in cases involving fetal anomalies" and for women dealing with mental illness or substance use disorders, the AP/Ledger-Enquirer reports.

Comments

PPGNW CEO Chris Charbonneau praised Suddock for "striking down these cruel restrictions on women's health and rights that violate the Alaska constitution." She said, "Every Alaskan woman, regardless of income, should be able to make the pregnancy decision that's best for herself and her family."

Meanwhile, Cori Mills, spokesperson for the state Department of Law, said the state was reviewing the ruling and would consider its options (Bohrer, AP/Columbus Ledger-Enquirer, 8/27).


Women's Health Policy Report Will Not Publish Aug. 31-Sept. 7

Fri, 08/28/2015 - 15:14

The Women's Health Policy Report will be on hiatus Monday, Aug. 31 through Monday, Sept. 7. The report resumes publication on Tuesday, Sept. 8.

Women's Health Policy Report Will Not Publish Aug. 31-Sept.7

August 28, 2015 — The Women's Health Policy Report will be on hiatus Monday, Aug. 31 through Monday, Sept. 7. The report resumes publication on Tuesday, Sept. 8.

Datapoints: Distance to the Nearest Abortion Provider Is Increasing; Which States Help Fund CPCs

Fri, 08/28/2015 - 15:06

In today's graphics, see the disparity in access to abortion care across the U.S. We also look at which states permit funds from specialty license plates with antiabortion-rights messaging to be allocated to crisis pregnancy centers.

Datapoints: Distance to the Nearest Abortion Provider Is Increasing; Which States Help Fund CPCs

August 28, 2015 — In today's graphics, see the disparity in access to abortion care across the U.S. We also look at which states permit funds from specialty license plates with antiabortion-rights messaging to be allocated to crisis pregnancy centers.

Accessing Abortion Providers



In this interactive map, the New York Times' "The Upshot" provides a snapshot of the average distance between each county in the U.S. and the nearest abortion clinic. The map highlights the long distances women in some of parts of the country, such as Texas, have to travel to access abortion care.

"The Upshot" further examines Texas in additional maps included in the story, showing how the partial implementation of the antiabortion-rights bill HB 2 increased the distances between the state's counties and the nearest clinics and how full implementation also would increase the cost of the procedure (Soffen, "The Upshot," New York Times, 8/19).


States Fund CPCs Through Antiabortion-Rights License Plates



This map, compiled with data from the Guttmacher Institute, spotlights the 29 states that offer specialty license plates with antiabortion-rights messaging.

According to "XX Factor," 15 of those states use proceeds from the license plate sales to help fund anti-abortion organizations or crisis pregnancy centers, which aim to deter women from accessing abortion care. In one ongoing case, American Civil Liberties Union is suing North Carolina for permitting the antiabortion-rights plates without offering an abortion-rights alternative, thereby engaging in "viewpoint discrimination" (Kirk, "XX Factor," Slate, 7/28).



How Planned Parenthood Allocates Funding



According to data from Planned Parenthood's 2013-2014 annual report, the organization uses its revenue primarily to fund contraception services, as well as testing and treatment for sexually transmitted infections. Meanwhile, the remaining revenue -- about 24% overall -- is used to provide cancer screenings and prevention, abortion care, other women's health care, and other services (Ross, "The Fix," Washington Post, 8/4).


Australian Court Rejects Bid To Protect Clinic from Antiabortion-Rights Protesters

Fri, 08/28/2015 - 13:57

The Victorian Supreme Court of Australia on Wednesday rejected a bid to require the city council to stop antiabortion-rights protests outside a Melbourne abortion clinic, ABC/AAP reports.

Australian Court Rejects Bid To Protect Clinic from Antiabortion-Rights Protesters

August 28, 2015 — The Victorian Supreme Court of Australia on Wednesday rejected a bid to require the city council to stop antiabortion-rights protests outside a Melbourne abortion clinic, ABC/AAP reports (ABC/AAP, 8/25).

Background

In June, the Victorian Supreme Court heard arguments from the East Melbourne Fertility Control Clinic, which said the Melbourne City Council had violated the state's Public Health and Wellbeing Act by failing to prevent antiabortion-rights protesters from harassing clinic patients and staff outside the clinic. The clinic said that a particular antiabortion-rights group, Helpers of God's Precious Infants, had targeted patients and staff at the clinic for the past 20 years.

According to the clinic, the protesters met the law's definition of a "nuisance," and the council failed to respond appropriately (Davey, The Guardian Australia, 8/25).

Details of Ruling

Justice Michael McDonald ruled that the city council had not failed to meet its responsibilities. However, he said the council acted inappropriately when it told the clinic the issue should be settled through the Victoria Police and that some of the protesters' actions, such as impeding clinic access, possibly could be deemed a nuisance.

The Melbourne City Council said it took "no relief or pleasure" in the decision, stating that it left concerns about the antiabortion-rights protesters "unresolved."

"The City of Melbourne sympathi[z]es with the women targeted by protesters at the East Melbourne Fertility Control Clinic and acknowledges the impact the group's presence has on the health and wellbeing of the clinic's patients, staff and management," the council said, adding, "For more than 20 years, the City of Melbourne has worked within its limited powers to protect the interests of women who attend the clinic. Although we have wanted to do more, we have not had the authority to do so."

Proposed Legislation

In related news, Fiona Patten, leader of the Australian Sex Party, last week introduced a bill into State Parliament that would enforce a 150-meter buffer zones around abortion clinics (ABC/AAP, 8/25).

Under the proposal, protesters would be prohibited from harassing, intimidating, blocking, communicating with or recording people entering the clinics (The Guardian Australia, 8/25). Individuals who violated the prohibition would be fined or, if a repeat offender, could be imprisoned (ABC/AAP, 8/25).

A spokesperson for Minister of Health Jill Hennessy said the government is reviewing the bill (The Guardian Australia, 8/25).


Colo. LARC Program Receives $2M in Temporary Funding

Fri, 08/28/2015 - 13:54

Several organizations have pledged a total of about $2 million to temporarily fund a Colorado program that helps low-income and uninsured women access long-acting reversible contraception, state officials announced on Tuesday, the Denver Post reports.

Colo. LARC Program Receives $2M in Temporary Funding

August 28, 2015 — Several organizations have pledged a total of about $2 million to temporarily fund a Colorado program that helps low-income and uninsured women access long-acting reversible contraception, state officials announced on Tuesday, the Denver Post reports (Paul, Denver Post, 8/25).

Program Details

The Colorado Family Planning Initiative offers no- or low-cost LARCs, such as intrauterine devices and hormonal implants, to low-income women at 68 clinics throughout the state. The initiative was established as a five-year pilot program through a private donation of about $25 million (Women's Health Policy Report, 7/8). The donation funding expired in July, and the program subsequently had longer waiting lists and was not able to offer as many services (Denver Post, 8/25).

The initiative has provided more than 30,000 IUDs and other LARC methods to low-income, uninsured or underinsured Colorado women. Since the initiative began, the state's teen birth rate has decreased by 40%. Meanwhile, the abortion rate among teens has decreased by 34%, according to Larry Wolk, Colorado's chief medical officer and executive director of the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment.

Further, in that period, the state has saved about $23 million from averted Medicaid costs associated with birth. CDPHE officials have predicted the program could save the state up to $40 million in Medicaid costs that would otherwise go toward pre- and postnatal care.

In May, a Colorado Senate committee killed a measure (HB 15-1194) that would have provided $5 million in funding to continue the program. However, state officials have said the program would remain in place (Women's Health Policy Report, 6/2).

Funding Details

More than a dozen organizations have pledged funding to help continue the program, the Post reports.

According to CDPHE, "With new funding from Colorado funders and foundations, the initiative will be able to continue training health care providers, educating women on contraceptive choices and subsidizing as many as 6,000 [IUDs] or implants."

Meanwhile, state health officials, with support from Gov. John Hickenlooper (D), said they will renew their efforts to get funding legislation approved next year (Denver Post, 8/25).


Blogs Comment on Consequences of Targeting Planned Parenthood, the '2015 Taco or Beer Challenge' for Abortion Funding, More

Thu, 08/27/2015 - 18:57

Read the week's best commentaries from the Huffington Post blogs, RH Reality Check and more.

Blogs Comment on Consequences of Targeting Planned Parenthood, the '2015 Taco or Beer Challenge' for Abortion Funding, More

August 21, 2015 — Read the week's best commentaries from the Huffington Post blogs, RH Reality Check and more.

ANTIABORTION-RIGHTS MOVEMENT: "The Attack on Planned Parenthood Is an Attack on the Impoverished," Matt Hartman, Huffington Post blogs: Hartman discusses the repercussions of defunding Planned Parenthood for low-income individuals, writing, "Defunding the largest organization providing education and pregnancy prevention services will only increase the percentage of young people relegated into poverty, not only in this generation but also for generations to come." He cites Planned Parenthood's 2014 Annual Report, which found that the organization "provide[s] over 5 million women, child[ren] and adolescents information on topics ranging from sexual health to pregnancy prevention" and that "their services prevent approximately ... 515,000 pregnancies from happening." Hartman notes that, "[l]ikely in large part due to many of these services, teenage birth, pregnancy and abortion rates are at their lowest points in 20 years." He writes, "A question to those defunding Planned Parenthood: how will you continue the prevention of pregnancy and provision of necessary sexual health services for people living in poverty?" According to Hartman, "[w]ithout other solutions, the consequences of defunding Planned Parenthood include subjugating more men, women and children to poverty, forcing more children into the child welfare system and destining many of them to poor outcomes" (Hartman, Huffington Post blogs, 8/18).

What others are saying about the antiabortion-rights movement:

~ "These States Are Illegally Defunding Planned Parenthood," Samantha Allen, Daily Beast.

~ "Missouri's 'Committee on the Sanctity of Life' Threatens a State Official," Teddy Wilson, RH Reality Check.

ABORTION-RIGHTS MOVEMENT: "It's Time Again To Eat a Taco, Drink a Beer, and Fund Abortion," Andrea Grimes, RH Reality Check: Grimes discusses the launch of the 2015 Taco or Beer Challenge, which began on Aug. 18 and runs through Sep. 18. According to Grimes, "[t]he challenge (ToBC for short) is incredibly simple: You eat a taco or you drink a beer, and you donate to an abortion fund." She writes, "Abortion funds, abortion funders, and reproductive freedom fighters around the world are hosting Taco Tuesday launch parties to celebrate," adding, "We're calling it International Taco or Beer Challenge Day, and more than two dozen events are already planned around the world, with more to come in the next four weeks." Grimes notes that "abortion stigma is real, and the ToBC is about busting that stigma by directly funding legal abortion care for people who need it." She adds that "[b]ecause the ToBC is fundamentally about freedom and choice" participants can celebrate the challenge however they wish, so long as they "donate to an abortion fund," which is "the only requirement, and therefore the most important one" (Grimes, RH Reality Check, 8/18).

FEMALE SEXUAL DYSFUNCTION: "Why Flibanserin Is Not the 'Female Viagra,'" Cari Romm, The Atlantic: "After three applications, ownership by two drug companies, and one successful lobbying campaign, the female sexual-dysfunction drug flibanserin was approved yesterday by [FDA]" and "will be sold under the brand name Addyi," Romm writes. According to Romm, the drug has been rejected twice based on "concerns that lingered even after an FDA advisory committee voted ... to recommend approval," including the drug's "effectiveness rate of somewhere between 8 and 13 percent" and how it "can cause side effects like fainting, dizziness, and low blood pressure, many of which were found to be exacerbated by alcohol and hormonal contraception." Further, Romm notes that while the drug has been "hailed by supporters as a step towards gender equality" -- given that FDA has approved 26 drugs for male sexual dysfunctions and no drugs, before Addyi, for FSD -- none of the MSD drugs "has the same purpose as filbanserin." She explains, "Viagra is taken before sex and increases blood flow to the genitals; flibanserin is supposed to be taken daily and aims further north, changing the balance of neurotransmitters in the brain." Romm also explores why the drug was approved after being rejected twice before, noting that Sprout, the drug's manufacturer, changed the way it measured the drug's effectiveness and that the condition it was designed to treat -- hypoactive sexual desire disorder -- was broadened to include not only female desire, but also female arousal (Romm, The Atlantic, 8/19).

POLITICS AND ELECTIONS: "Getting Republicans on Record About How Fetal Research Has Helped Them," Carole Joffe, RH Reality Check: Joffe discusses the hypocrisy of some conservative lawmakers who denounce fetal tissue research as part of their campaign against Planned Parenthood while also having benefited from vaccines developed through such research. Sharing her own experience growing up with the threat of polio, Joffe writes, "As this sorry spectacle of manufactured hysteria about Planned Parenthood and fetal tissue research plays out, it occurs to me that many Americans now alive simply do not remember the absolute terror of contracting polio that was rampant before the vaccine became widely available in the mid-1950s." The polio vaccine was developed through fetal tissue research, as were the vaccines for "hepatitis A, chickenpox, rubella, and rabies," she explains, adding that "fetal tissue research may also bring promising future developments, such as in the study or treatment of juvenile diabetes, Parkinson's disease, HIV, and breast cancer." However, according to Joffe, most researchers who rely on fetal tissue for their work "have, with a few exceptions, been intimidated into silence because of fears of anti-abortion harassment and violence." Joffe questions how conservative lawmakers' stances against fetal tissue research and Planned Parenthood might shift later in the 2016 presidental election, when they have to appeal to a broader voter base, noting, "One might be cautiously optimistic that even in a degraded political environment such as ours, most voters will think that getting rid of diseases is a good thing" (Joffe, RH Reality Check, 8/20).

SEXUALITY EDUCATION: "Arizona School District Adds Abstinence-Only, Anti-Choice Sticker to Science Textbook," Maya Dusenbery, Feministing: "Last year, the conservative Gilbert School District decided that ... they should probably censor the parts of the high school honors biology textbook that mention contraception and abortion" to comply with state laws requiring schools that teach sexuality education "to stress abstinence" and to "'present childbirth and adoption as preferred options to ... abortion,'" Dusenbery writes. According to Dusenbery, school officials "dropped their original plan to literally just rip out those pages, and instead are handing out ... stickers and requiring students to put them on the inside cover of their book as a little reminder of the state's values." Dusenbery includes an image of the sticker, which reads, in part, "'The Gilbert Public School District supports the state of Arizona's strong interest in promoting childbirth and adoption over elective abortion. The District is also in support of promoting abstinence as the most effective way to eliminate the potential for unwanted pregnancy and sexually transmitted [infections].'" Dusenbery writes, "Translation: 'We believe in withholding information on how to prevent unintended pregnancies from you ... Though we are educators charged with giving you the information you need to succeed in life, we wash our hands of this matter'" (Dusenbery, Feministing, 8/20).

DISCRIMINATION: "Coalition Calls on Obama To End Taxpayer-Funded Religious Discrimination," Jessica Mason Pieklo, RH Reality Check: "A coalition of more than 130 organizations representing religious, education, civil rights, and labor organizations called on President Obama on Thursday to review a Bush-era legal memo the groups claim is used to justify taxpayer-funded religious discrimination," Mason Pieklo writes. According to Mason Pieklo, the American Civil Liberties Union, the Human Rights Campaign, NARAL Pro-Choice, Planned Parenthood and "hundreds of others" in a letter to Obama wrote that a 2007 "memorandum from the Office of Legal Counsel (OLC) reaches the 'erroneous and dangerous conclusion' that the Religious Freedom Restoration Act of 1993 (RFRA) [PL 103-141] provides a 'blanket override of a statutory non-discrimination provision.'" The coalition "cites several examples in which religious conservatives are trying to use the OLC letter to avoid complying with federal civil rights laws," she writes. For example, they said the OLC memo has been used in efforts to practice religious hiring discrimination; to support "claims that RFRA should broadly exempt religiously affiliated government contractors from complying with an executive order barring such employees from discriminating against [lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender] workers"; and to support claims that the government should allow "religious objectors to refuse to provide any reproductive health services or referrals while still receiving federal grant money." Noting that RFRA does not support such actions, the coalition "calls on President Obama to legal[ly] direct the Office of Legal Counsel (OLC) to review and withdraw the memo" (Mason Pieklo, RH Reality Check, 8/20).


Texas Clinic Spends $3 Million To Comply With HB 2 Building Requirements

Thu, 08/27/2015 - 18:57

Two abortion providers in San Antonio spent $3 million on their clinic to make it compliant with the ambulatory surgical center requirements imposed by Texas' omnibus antiabortion-rights law (HB 2), the Texas Observer reports.

Texas Clinic Spends $3 Million To Comply With HB 2 Building Requirements

August 24, 2015 — Two abortion providers in San Antonio spent $3 million on their clinic to make it compliant with the ambulatory surgical center requirements imposed by Texas' omnibus antiabortion-rights law (HB 2), the Texas Observer reports (Garcia-Ditta, Texas Observer, 8/19).

Background

HB 2, passed in 2013, prohibits abortion after 20 weeks' gestation, restricts the use of medication abortion, requires abortion clinics to meet the building standards of ambulatory surgical centers and mandates that abortion providers have admitting privileges at nearby hospitals.

The Center for Reproductive Rights filed suit against certain provisions in the law, including the ambulatory surgical center requirement and whether abortion clinics in El Paso and McAllen should be exempt from the law's admitting privileges requirement. The 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals upheld most of the challenged provisions. The case is currently being appealed to the Supreme Court, which has placed a temporary hold on the ambulatory surgical center requirement while considering whether to hear the lawsuit. There was debate as to whether the Supreme Court order also blocked the law's admitting privileges requirement (Women's Health Policy Report, 8/19).

The state currently has 17 clinics, down from 41 in 2012. Seven of the remaining clinics are not able to meet HB 2's ambulatory surgical center requirement and will close if the high court rules in favor of the law or opts not to consider the case (Women's Health Policy Report, 8/20).

Compliance Process

According to the Observer, abortion providers Alan Braid and Eduardo Aquino previously operated Alamo Women's Reproductive Services. However, they decided to take out a loan to purchase a former radiology clinic and convert it into an abortion clinic compliant with HB 2's ambulatory surgical center requirement to ensure that they could continue providing abortion care. The new center, Alamo City Surgery Center, opened in June.

To be compliant with the ambulatory surgical center requirement, the facility has separate waiting rooms for the clinic and the surgical center, 8-foot-wide hallways, 240-square-foot operating rooms, specialized ventilation systems, specialized fire and safety features, a locker room and shower for staff, and two janitorial closets, at least one of which must be equipped with a faucet and drain. The building had to pass two state inspections before it was allowed to open.

In addition, the surgical center in meeting the standards also has separate post-operative beds for recovery. Individuals in the operating area are required to wear sterile scrub hats and booties. Furthermore, state inspector in a few months will visit the building to review patient records and administrative files. Braid also said he had to hire additional staff.

Meanwhile, according to the Observer, women seeking abortion care first must visit the building's clinic and then visit the building's surgical center after a 24-hour mandatory delay. According to the Observer, Texas requires ambulatory surgical centers for medication abortion, as well.

Comments

Braid said he and Aquino decided to buy the property and upgrade it because it was "the only way to ensure we could keep seeing patients and be prepared for when [HB 2] was enforced."

However, he noted, "There is no basis in fact that doing procedures here (is) any safer than doing them in a local doctor's office," adding, "I see the absurdity in all this, the unnecessary waste and obstacles thrown at providers and patients for no reason other than ideology." According to the Observer, research has shown that abortions performed in outpatient clinics are as safe as those performed in ambulatory surgical centers.

Similarly, Dan Grossman, a researcher with Ibis Reproductive Health and the Texas Policy Evaluation Project, noted, "For a [medication] abortion, a woman just has to be handed a tablet. There is no reason to be in a building that's set up for major surgery" (Texas Observer, 8/19).


Kansas' Move To Defund Planned Parenthood Curbs Health Care Access for Low-Income Residents

Thu, 08/27/2015 - 18:57

Many health care services for low-income residents in Kansas have been cut following the state's move to defund Planned Parenthood, the AP/San Francisco Chronicle reports.

Kansas' Move To Defund Planned Parenthood Curbs Health Care Access for Low-Income Residents

August 24, 2015 — Many health care services for low-income residents in Kansas have been cut following the state's move to defund Planned Parenthood, the AP/San Francisco Chronicle reports.

Background

According to the AP/Chronicle, the news comes as several states move to defund the organization following the release of a series of videos targeting Planned Parenthood (Hegeman, AP/San Francisco Chronicle, 8/21).

The videos, which depict Planned Parenthood staff discussing fetal tissue donation, were released by an antiabortion-rights group called the Center for Medical Progress. CMP secretly filmed the videos by meeting with Planned Parenthood staff while posing as buyers of fetal tissue.

Planned Parenthood has stated that the videos were heavily edited and that the filmed officials did not conduct any illegal activities. The organization said it does not profit from fetal tissue donations and only receives reimbursement for costs associated with such donations, which is legal. Meanwhile, supporters of Planned Parenthood said the videos are part of a decades-long campaign against the organization (Women's Health Policy Report, 8/13).

Elizabeth Nash, state issues associate at the Guttmacher Institute, said at least eight states -- Alabama, Arkansas, Illinois, Louisiana, New Hampshire, Ohio, Utah and Wisconsin -- have taken legislative action to cut funding for the organization following the release of the misleading videos. She added that 11 states between 2011 and this July already have acted to reduce Planned Parenthood funding (AP/San Francisco Chronicle, 8/21).

Meanwhile, the Obama administration has warned that efforts to block Planned Parenthood from receiving Medicaid funds could violate federal law (Women's Health Policy Report, 8/13).

Ramifications in Kansas

Kansas lawmakers in 2011 passed a measure that gave federal funding first to public health departments and hospitals, effectively eliminating funding for specialized family planning clinics. The state said it could provide better reproductive health care by giving Title X funding to facilities that offer a broader range of care and that it would use the Planned Parenthood funding at other facilities and provide the same services.

However, after the move, Kansas officials acknowledged that federal funding had been cut by the amount previously allocated for Planned Parenthood, meaning that there "was no additional funding to give to other clinics." For example, the state lost $370,000 in annual Title X funding that had gone to two Planned Parenthood clinics and an unaffiliated clinic located in Dodge City, none of which had been used for abortion services. According to the AP/Chronicle, the two Planned Parenthood clinics -- located in Wichita and Hays -- had provided 9,000 contraception visits, 3,000 Pap tests, 3,000 breast exams and 18,000 tests for sexually transmitted infections before they lost their portion of the funding.

The unaffiliated clinic has closed, and Planned Parenthood in May 2014 said it would close the clinic in Hays, the smaller of the two facilities, to focus on the larger facility in Wichita. According to Planned Parenthood, the Wichita clinic now is reporting fewer patients, particularly patients who rely on Title X funding for reproductive health care and cancer screenings.

Further, according to an Associated Press investigation into KDHE distributions over the last three years, the state has reduced the share of federal family planning funding for the health department in Sedgwick County, where the Wichita Planned Parenthood is located. Specifically, the Sedgwick County Health Department is projected to receive $167,790 in federal family planning funding in fiscal 2016, down from $276,900 in fiscal year 2014. Meanwhile, the Wichita Planned Parenthood clinic is unable to provide the no-cost contraceptives and other medical services it previously could afford to offer.

In addition, family planning clinics closed in Ford and Ellis counties over a year ago, and the counties still do not have a Title X provider for low-income patients.

Comments

Elise Higgins, manager of government affairs for Planned Parenthood of Kansas and Mid-Missouri, said, "We have a number of women in Kansas who need publically funded contraception and services, but aren't receiving it."

Similarly, J'Vonnah Maryman, director for public health at the SCHD, said, "People have fewer places to go, and for those with limited means that may make utilizing those services even more difficult" (AP/San Francisco Chronicle, 8/21).


Mo. Lawmakers, Health Officials Debate Abortion Clinic License Requirements

Thu, 08/27/2015 - 18:57

On Tuesday, conservative state senators and the health department director in Missouri debated at a hearing whether Columbia Planned Parenthood met state licensing requirements when it received its license in July, AP/Sacramento Bee reports.

Mo. Lawmakers, Health Officials Debate Abortion Clinic License Requirements

August 27, 2015 — On Tuesday, conservative state senators and the health department director in Missouri debated at a hearing whether Columbia Planned Parenthood met state licensing requirements when it received its license in July, AP/Sacramento Bee reports.

Background

Under state law, abortion clinics are required to meet ambulatory surgical center requirements. According to the AP/Bee, to meet those requirements, physicians who provide surgical abortions, or the clinic where they perform such procedures, must have admitting privileges with a nearby hospital (Ballentine, AP/Sacramento Bee, 8/25).

Columbia Planned Parenthood had to suspend abortion care several years ago, after the physician who provided the procedure resigned. The clinic offered abortion referrals from that time until earlier this month, when it resumed providing abortion care (Women's Health Policy Report, 7/20). According to Gail Vasterling, director of Missouri's Department of Health and Senior Services, the Columbia Planned Parenthood only provides medication abortions.

According to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, an interim committee in the state Senate was convened to investigate Planned Parenthood following the release of misleading videos targeting the organization (Stuckey, St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 8/25).

Hearing Details

During the hearing, state Sen. Kurt Schaefer (R) -- chair of the Missouri Senate Appropriations Committee and the investigative committee -- said the clinic failed to meet the ambulatory surgical center standards because the physician providing abortion care at the Columbia clinic does not have admitting privileges.

Meanwhile, Vasterling said the standard does not apply because the clinic only provides medication abortions, not surgical abortions. "They comply ... because they don't perform surgeries," Vasterling said (AP/Sacramento Bee, 8/25).

R. Bowen Loftin, University of Missouri's chancellor, explained that the clinic's physician was granted "refer and follow" privileges at University of Missouri Health Care, which allows the physician to refer patients to the hospital and access their medical records after they have been admitted.

According to the Post-Dispatch, physicians at the clinic or the clinic itself would need to obtain admitting privilege requirements only if the clinic starts to offer surgical abortion. Vasterling said Planned Parenthood intends to meet again with UM officials to obtain admitting privileges before offering surgical abortions, which it plans to provide beginning in early 2016 (St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 8/25).

Schaefer also claimed that UM officials broke state law by advising the physician at Columbia Planned Parenthood by email on how to keep privileges at UM Health Care. However, Loftin said federal law prohibits the university from denying the privileges to physicians because they provide legal abortion services. Further, Loftin explained that UM officials consulting with the clinic physician primarily provided paperwork, while other UM officials were tasked with the final decision on approving the privileges (AP/Sacramento Bee, 8/25).


Planned Parenthood App Helps Alaska Women Access Birth Control

Thu, 08/27/2015 - 18:57

Women in Alaska can now obtain birth control remotely via Planned Parenthood's Get Care application, which can be used on mobile devices and desktop computers, the Juneau Empire reports.

Planned Parenthood App Helps Alaska Women Access Birth Control

August 26, 2015 — Women in Alaska can now obtain birth control remotely via Planned Parenthood's Get Care application, which can be used on mobile devices and desktop computers, the Juneau Empire reports.

App Details

The Get Care app connects patients with Planned Parenthood clinicians, who can provide contraception after a consultation via video chat. Users can install the app on a desktop computer by visiting the Web portal, or download the app to a smartphone or tablet. According to the Empire, the app uses encrypted technology to protect patient privacy.

Using the app, patients can "video visit" with a clinician and select birth control pills, a vaginal ring or a hormonal patch, and the contraceptive method they choose is mailed to them in discreet packaging. Erin Mahony, a nurse practitioner who works with a program, said the video consultations are available throughout the work week, as well as on weekends and during the evening.

Chris Charbonneau, CEO of Planned Parenthood of the Great Northwest, said the services could be particularly helpful for women who face challenges scheduling or traveling to an in-person consultation as well as women who live in small towns where privacy can be limited.

The Get Care app also is available in Minnesota and Washington state (Griffiths, Juneau Empire, 8/24). Meanwhile, the organization offers an app that allows individuals in three states -- California, Minnesota and Washington state -- to purchase at-home tests for two sexually transmitted infections (Women's Health Policy Report, 7/24). Planned Parenthood intends to make the STI testing app available in Alaska in the future.

Costs

The video consultations cost $45 for people without insurance. Meanwhile, insured residents -- other than those who are covered through Medicaid, which does not cover video services -- should be covered for the video consultations.

According to Charbonneau, some individuals whose insurers do not contract with Planned Parenthood have successfully petitioned their insurer for the out-of-pocket costs. She added that Planned Parenthood is pushing for the federal government to have Medicaid support use of technology in health care. Meanwhile, low-income individuals might qualify for financial assistance.

App Helps Women in Rural Communities, Keeps Care Private

Charbonneau noted that the app is particularly helpful for women in Alaska, which is a very rural state with only four Planned Parenthood clinics.

She also cited how it can help women keep their reproductive health decisions private in smaller towns, noting, "It's private, you get what you need -- it's the next best way of providing preventive health" (Juneau Empire, 8/24).


Blogs Comment on Mich. Abortion Ban Proposal, Court Rulings on Federal Contraceptive Coverage Rules, More

Thu, 08/27/2015 - 18:57

Read the week's best commentaries from bloggers at RH Reality Check, Huffington Post blogs and more.

Blogs Comment on Mich. Abortion Ban Proposal, Court Rulings on Federal Contraceptive Coverage Rules, More

August 25, 2015 — Read the week's best commentaries from bloggers at RH Reality Check, Huffington Post blogs and more.

ABORTION RESTRICTIONS: "Michigan Republican: Ban Common Second-Trimester Abortion Procedure," Teddy Wilson, RH Reality Check: Michigan Rep. Laura Cox (R) "introduced two bills [HB 4833, HB 4834] that would criminalize a medical procedure used after a miscarriage and during second-trimester abortions," Wilson writes. The bills "would target the dilation and evacuation (D and E) procedure, commonly used in second-trimester abortion care," he notes, adding that similar measures have been proposed in six other states and signed into law in Oklahoma (HB 1721) and Kansas (SB 95). Wilson discusses the imprecise and contradictory language in one of the Michigan bills, HB 4833, noting that the measure's "broad and vague language and lack of medical terminology makes the possible implications on abortion care unclear." Meanwhile, "HB 4834 would change the state's criminal code; violation of the law would constitute a class G felony punishable by a maximum of two years in prison or a maximum fine of $50,000," Wilson writes. According to Wilson, the "bills have been referred to the Committee on Criminal Justice for further consideration" (Wilson, RH Reality Check, 8/21).

What others are saying about abortion restrictions:

~ "Republicans Find Their Next Anti-Choice Innovation," Paul Waldman, American Prospect.

CONTRACEPTION: "Federal Appeals Courts Unanimous in Support of Obamacare's Birth Control Accommodation," Jessica Mason Pieklo, RH Reality Check: "A federal appeals court on Friday reaffirmed a ruling that the accommodation process to the birth control benefit in the Affordable Care Act [PL 111-148] does not violate the Religious Freedom Restoration Act [PL 103-141]," Mason Pieklo writes. According to Mason Pieklo, "The decision came from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit in a challenge brought by six Catholic groups in Tennessee and Michigan, which argued the process of completing the paperwork to receive the accommodation unduly burdened their religious rights." She writes, "The plaintiffs in Michigan Catholic Conference argued that completing the form to qualify for the exemption violates RFRA because the act of completing the form 'triggers' or 'facilitates' the ability of their employees to get contraceptive coverage elsewhere, which the plaintiffs claim makes them 'complicit' in the sin of facilitating contraception ... But a three-judge panel from the Sixth Circuit rejected these arguments and unanimously affirmed its earlier ruling that completing the paperwork is not a RFRA violation." Mason Pieklo notes, "Meanwhile, the Tenth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals issued another ruling in the nonprofit contraception challenges, granting a request by the Little Sisters of the Poor to put on hold its earlier decision that the accommodation process does not burden the organization's religious rights while the Little Sisters asks the U.S. Supreme Court to step in" (Mason Pieklo, RH Reality Check, 8/24).

REPRODUCTIVE JUSTICE: "Improving Reproductive Care for Women in Jail Is Not an Impossible Task," Kyl Myers, RH Reality Check: Although "[w]omen in city and county jails frequently face barriers to accessing contraception, abortion, prenatal care, and disease screening and treatment," putting in place "a few core tenets" for incarcerated women could improve "preventive family planning ... in jails around the United States," Myers writes. Myers explains that while "the female jail population has been the fastest-growing correctional population," according to the Department of Justice, "the National Commission on Correctional Health Care has stated that women's sex-specific health-care needs remain unmet due to their minority status in a male-dominated jail population." According to Myers, "[t]here are no federally mandated guidelines for women's health care in jails," and "health care arrangements [often] do not include appointments with obstetrics and gynecological health providers." She writes, "Although some members of the public may believe that contraception and other reproductive care needs aren't necessary because of facilities' sex-segregation, discontinuing women's birth control and not providing contraceptives before release may increase the likelihood of women experiencing an unintended pregnancy post-incarceration." Myers provides several recommendations that "should be initiated in all local jails housing women," such as providing inmates with access to birth control, emergency contraception, pregnancy tests and prenatal care, as well as preconception resources for women who want to become pregnant after their release (Myers, RH Reality Check, 8/24).

ANTIABORTION-RIGHTS MOVEMENT: "No, Defunding Planned Parenthood Wouldn't Make Colorado Better," Jason Salzman, Huffington Post blogs: While "there are many more community health centers than Planned Parenthood" facilities in Colorado, defunding Planned Parenthood and redistributing the money to community health centers "doesn't mean ... the community health clinics would provide equal or greater access to healthcare than what's available now," Salzman writes. He notes that studies have found "the community health center (CHC) network and federally qualified health center (FQHCs) network don't offer all types of birth control and reproductive health care," adding that "many large community health centers actually ... refer patients to Planned Parenthood." Further, Medicaid beneficiaries "go disproportionately to Planned Parenthood for these services," Salzman notes, adding that as a result, "defunding Planned Parenthood would weaken our country's already weak safety net." Moreover, although the law prohibits both Planned Parenthood and community health centers from using federal funding for most abortion services, "Planned Parenthood offers this option through other funding sources, while the community health clinics do not," Salzman states (Salzman, Huffington Post blog, 8/21).

What others are saying about the antiabortion-rights movement:

~ "Crime-Tracking Service Wrongly Calls Abortion 'Murder,'" Hans Johnson, Huffington Post blogs.


6th Circuit Affirms Ruling for Contraceptive Coverage Rules; 10th Circuit Issues Stay on Rules

Thu, 08/27/2015 - 18:57

he 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on Friday affirmed its prior judgment that accommodations to federal contraceptive coverage rules for not-for-profits that hold themselves out as religious do not violate the Religious Freedom Restoration Act (PL 103-141), the AP/Franklin Daily Journal reports.

6th Circuit Affirms Ruling for Contraceptive Coverage Rules; 10th Circuit Issues Stay on Rules

August 25, 2015 — The 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on Friday affirmed its prior judgment that accommodations to federal contraceptive coverage rules for not-for-profits that hold themselves out as religious do not violate the Religious Freedom Restoration Act (PL 103-141), the AP/Franklin Daily Journal reports (Loller, AP/Franklin Daily Journal, 8/21).

Case Background

The Catholic Charities Diocese of Kalamazoo, Catholic Charities of Tennessee, Catholic Diocese of Nashville and Michigan Catholic Conference object to an accommodation under the Affordable Care Act's (PL 111-148) contraceptive coverage rules that applies to not-for-profits that hold themselves out as religious and oppose contraception.

The accommodation enables such not-for-profits to notify their insurers or third-party administrators of their objection so the insurers or third-party administrators can facilitate contraceptive coverage for members of their health plans. To claim the accommodation, the not-for-profits may either complete a form to send to the insurers or third-party administrators or send a letter to HHS stating that they object to offering contraceptive coverage in their health plans.

The 6th Circuit Court in June 2014 ruled against the plaintiffs, finding that the plaintiffs' arguments did not demonstrate that the accommodation represents "a substantial burden on appellants' exercise of religion." However, the Supreme Court in April ordered the 6th Circuit to reconsider its ruling in light of the high court's 2014 decision in Burwell v. Hobby Lobby, which found that closely held corporations cannot be required to provide contraceptive coverage in their employer-sponsored health plans if the corporations' owners have religious objections to contraception.

The high court has remanded several other decisions related to the federal contraceptive coverage rules since the Hobby Lobby ruling (Women's Health Policy Report, 4/28).

Ruling Details

A three-judge panel on the 6th Circuit on Friday affirmed its initial ruling (AP/Franklin Daily Journal, 8/21).

The judges said the federal contraceptive coverage rules' accommodation for not-for-profits that hold themselves out as religious and oppose contraception "effectively insulates these entities from the contraception-provision process." The judges explained, "They no longer have to pay for contraceptive coverage, and all individuals under their plans are notified of the entity's religious objections."

Further, the ruling noted that Hobby Lobby pertains to a "fundamentally different" issue than the case before the 6th Circuit, which involves "whether an entity's decision not to provide such coverage by exercising an accommodation is, by itself, a violation of that entity's religious beliefs" (McVicar, MLive/Grand Rapids Press, 8/21).

10th Circuit Stays Contraceptive Coverage Ruling While Challengers Seek SCOTUS Review

In related news, the 10th Circuit Court of Appeals on Friday granted a request to stay its earlier ruling upholding the accommodation while opponents of the contraceptive coverage rules ask the Supreme Court to consider their case, Reuters reports (Coffman, Reuters, 8/21).

The 10th Circuit in July ruled that the federal government's contraceptive coverage accommodation for not-for-profits that hold themselves out as religious does not infringe on the religious rights of a Colorado-based order of nuns, four Christian colleges in Oklahoma and an evangelist organization called Reaching Souls International (Women's Health Policy Report, 7/15). The plaintiffs requested the stay while they petition the Supreme Court to hear their case.

On Friday, a three-judge panel on the 10th Circuit said the stay would remain in place until the high court decides whether to hear the case, and, if it does hear the case, "the stay of the mandate shall continue until the Supreme Court's final disposition" (Reuters, 8/21).


NY Times: Ohio Abortion Ban Part of National Effort To Overturn Roe

Thu, 08/27/2015 - 18:57

"It is tempting to dismiss the latest anti-choice salvo [HB 135] from Ohio lawmakers, which would criminalize abortions based on a fetal diagnosis of Down syndrome, as a blatantly unconstitutional ploy that would never be enforced," but the measure "stands a disturbingly good chance of approval this fall," according to a New York Times editorial.

NY Times: Ohio Abortion Ban Part of National Effort To Overturn Roe

August 25, 2015 — "It is tempting to dismiss the latest anti-choice salvo [HB 135] from Ohio lawmakers, which would criminalize abortions based on a fetal diagnosis of Down syndrome, as a blatantly unconstitutional ploy that would never be enforced," but the measure "stands a disturbingly good chance of approval this fall," according to a New York Times editorial.

According to the editorial, the conservative-controlled Ohio Legislature "has been passing abortion restrictions as quickly as it can write them in the four-plus years since Gov. John Kasich [R] ... took office," imposing "all manner of obstacles in the way of women trying to exercise their constitutional right to an abortion." However, the new bill "would go even further, purporting to tell a woman that her personal, private reason for ending her pregnancy is not good enough," the editorial states.

The editorial continues that the Ohio proposal is similar to a 2013 North Dakota law (HB 1305) that "bans abortions on the grounds of fetal genetic anomalies, including Down syndrome." The North Dakota "law has not yet been enforced -- under existing Supreme Court precedent it is hard to see how it could be -- but as with so many restrictions on a woman's right to choose, that is not the only measure of its power," the editorial states.

The editorial explains that abortion-rights supporters "do not have the resources to challenge every one of the hundreds of restrictions that have been enacted around the country -- even those that are obviously unconstitutional." Meanwhile, "laws that target a woman's motives for ending a pregnancy can do great harm to the doctor-patient relationship," the editorial notes, adding, "Doctors may avoid offering appropriate services out of a fear of prosecution," while women may be forced to withhold information "in order to obtain safe and legal care."

The editorial states, "It is hard to imagine any other circumstance in which Americans would tolerate this sort of government intrusion." However, "this is precisely the dilemma that opponents of the right to choose aim to create: instilling guilt and fear in women making intensely personal and private decisions about their own bodies," the editorial continues.

While a majority of U.S. and Ohio residents "support a woman's right to choose," conservative Ohio lawmakers "have ignored their constituents and plowed ahead with 16 abortion restrictions, all signed by ... Kasich, since 2011." These restrictions "are part of a larger national effort to undermine reproductive rights and, eventually, to overturn Roe v. Wade in full -- a prospect that once seemed unimaginable," the editorial continues, adding, "But under a Supreme Court that has grown increasingly receptive to such boundary-pushing legislation, the future looks a lot like America before 1973" (New York Times, 8/25).


In New Tactic, Abortion-Rights Opponents Disclose Personal Information on Women, Abortion Providers

Thu, 08/27/2015 - 18:57

Abortion-rights opponents increasingly are uncovering personal information about abortion providers and women who have received abortion care in an effort to increase abortion stigma and restrict abortion access, ProPublica/Washington Post reports.

In New Tactic, Abortion-Rights Opponents Disclose Personal Information on Women, Abortion Providers

August 26, 2015 — Abortion-rights opponents increasingly are uncovering personal information about abortion providers and women who have received abortion care in an effort to increase abortion stigma and restrict abortion access, ProPublica/Washington Post reports.

According to abortion-rights supporters, these tactics ultimately are designed to restrict abortion access and endanger patients and providers by disclosing identifying information.

Antiabortion-Rights Tactics

According to ProPublica/Post, antiabortion-rights activists have employed a number of tactics to obtain personal information and public records, which they publish on their websites or use to file complaints with health agencies against abortion providers.

Tactics include accessing 911 call records and data from state health departments and medical boards. In addition, some abortion-rights opponents have searched through clinics' trash for patient information and waited outside of clinics to photograph the license plates of ambulances, staff or patients.

Meanwhile, some health care providers also leak information to antiabortion-rights activists. According to ProPublica/Post, health care providers are required to protect patient information under the 1996 Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (PL 104-191), or HIPAA, but the law does not apply to advocacy groups if they receive such information.

Tactics Run Result in Unfounded Complaints

Antiabortion-rights groups' efforts to use patient and provide information has resulted in unfounded complaints in some states.

For example, the antiabortion-rights group Operation Rescue and another organization filed complaints with the New Mexico medical board against an Albuquerque abortion provider, after the groups obtained a recording of a 911 call made when a patient experienced a complication. While the physician was exonerated, many personal details about the patient -- including her initials and the location of her residence -- were made public in a transcript of the hearing.

National Abortion Federation CEO Vicki Saporta said, "The woman clearly did not want her privacy violated. She didn't want to talk to anybody."

Operation Rescue estimates that it has 100 pending complaints nationwide.

Privacy Issues at Play

According to ProPublica/Post, disputes over what information about abortions can be made public and what is protected under privacy laws has put the issue before courts across the U.S.

For example, a court agreed with the state of Louisiana when it said that records on abortion care for minors -- including patient ages, the ages of the men involved in the pregnancy and any complications -- were exempt from disclosure. The records had been requested by an antiabortion-rights activist.

Meanwhile, Planned Parenthood recently sued in a case involving an abortion-rights opponent in Washington state, Jonathan Bloedow, who has asked for information about abortion providers under the state's Public Records Act. Specifically, Bloedow had asked for data from the state health department on age and race of abortion patients, the duration of patients' pregnancies and how many previous abortions patients might have obtained.

According to ProPublica/Post, Bloedow had received the information for one abortion provider and was set to receive additional information when Planned Parenthood sued, noting that sharing the information would violate the state health department's rules and laws on patient privacy.

Laura Einstein -- chief legal counsel of Planned Parenthood of the Great Northwest and the Hawaiian Islands, which filed suit to block Bloedow's request -- said, "I don't think there's any margin for error here," adding, "These women came to a private health center to have a private health procedure, and that's just not anybody's business" (Ornstein, ProPublica/Washington Post, 8/25).


Forensics Experts Find CMP Videos Manipulated, Unreliable for Investigative Purposes

Thu, 08/27/2015 - 18:57

Recently released videos that target Planned Parenthood were manipulated, making them unreliable for official inquiries into the organization, according to a report Planned Parenthood submitted to Congress on Thursday, the New York Times reports.

Forensics Experts Find CMP Videos Manipulated, Unreliable for Investigative Purposes

August 27, 2015 — Recently released videos that target Planned Parenthood were manipulated, making them unreliable for official inquiries into the organization, according to a report Planned Parenthood submitted to Congress on Thursday, the New York Times reports.

According to the Times, Planned Parenthood commissioned the report from Fusion GPS, a research and corporate intelligence firm, and Glenn Simpson, Fusion's co-founder and former investigative journalist for the Wall Street Journal (Calmes, New York Times, 8/27).

Background

The videos, which depict Planned Parenthood staff discussing fetal tissue donation, were released by an antiabortion-rights group called the Center for Medical Progress. CMP secretly filmed the videos by meeting with Planned Parenthood staff while posing as buyers of fetal tissue.

Planned Parenthood has stated that the videos were heavily edited and that the filmed officials did not conduct any illegal activities. The organization said it does not profit from fetal tissue donations and only receives reimbursement for costs associated with such donations, which is legal. Meanwhile, supporters of Planned Parenthood said the videos are part of a decades-long campaign against the organization.

Following the videos' release, conservative lawmakers on the House Energy and Commerce Committee in July launched an investigation into Planned Parenthood (Women's Health Policy Report, 7/24). Meanwhile, Attorney General Loretta Lynch (D) has said the Department of Justice is "going to review all the information and determine what steps, if any, to take at the appropriate time" (Women's Health Policy Report, 7/29).

Report Details

According to the Times, Cecile Richards, president of Planned Parenthood Federation of America, sent the report to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), House Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio), Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.).

The report assesses footage and transcripts from content CMP recorded in California, Colorado and Texas. CMP has since released more footage (New York Times, 8/27).

Specifically, the researchers looked at five shorter clips that featured snippets of conversation taken from meetings between Planned Parenthood and CMP (King, Washington Examiner, 8/27). The researchers also examined four longer pieces of footage, from which the shorter videos were compiled, that CPM activist David Daleiden claims are full-length recordings. A service was hired to transcribe the footage -- without being notified that Planned Parenthood was the client -- to compare with the transcripts provided by CMP.

In comparing the two transcripts, researchers found that there were "substantive omissions" in CMP's content. The researchers said, "A thorough review of these videos in consultation with qualified experts found that they do not present a complete or accurate record of the events they purport to depict." For example, they noted that certain recordings collected in Colorado and Texas cut roughly 30 minutes of content from the alleged full-footage videos and that the edited material in the shorter videos misleadingly portrays comments from Planned Parenthood staff.

They concluded that "the manipulation of the videos does mean they have no evidentiary value in a legal context and cannot be relied upon for any official inquiries," unless CMP shares original footage that is independently assessed and found to be unaltered (New York Times, 8/27).


Datapoints: Distance to the Nearest Abortion Provider Is Increasing; Which States Help Fund CPCs

Thu, 08/27/2015 - 18:47

In today's graphics, see the disparity in access to abortion care across the U.S. We also look at which states permit funds from specialty license plates with antiabortion-rights messaging to be allocated to crisis pregnancy centers.

Datapoints: Distance to the Nearest Abortion Provider Is Increasing; Which States Help Fund CPCs

August 27, 2015 — In today's graphics, see the disparity in access to abortion care across the U.S. We also look at which states permit funds from specialty license plates with antiabortion-rights messaging to be allocated to crisis pregnancy centers.

Accessing Abortion Providers



In this interactive map, the New York Times' "The Upshot" provides a snapshot of the average distance between each county in the U.S. and the nearest abortion clinic. The map highlights the long distances women in some of parts of the country, such as Texas, have to travel to access abortion care.

"The Upshot" further examines Texas in additional maps included in the story, showing how the partial implementation of the antiabortion-rights bill HB 2 increased the distances between the state's counties and the nearest clinics and how full implementation also would increase the cost of the procedure (Soffen, "The Upshot," New York Times, 8/19).


States Fund CPCs Through Antiabortion-Rights License Plates



This map, compiled with data from the Guttmacher Institute, spotlights the 29 states that offer specialty license plates with antiabortion-rights messaging.

According to "XX Factor," 15 of those states use proceeds from the license plate sales to help fund anti-abortion organizations or crisis pregnancy centers, which aim to deter women from accessing abortion care. In one ongoing case, American Civil Liberties Union is suing North Carolina for permitting the antiabortion-rights plates without offering an abortion-rights alternative, thereby engaging in "viewpoint discrimination" (Kirk, "XX Factor," Slate, 7/28).



How Planned Parenthood Allocates Funding



According to data from Planned Parenthood's 2013-2014 annual report, the organization uses its revenue primarily to fund contraception services, as well as testing and treatment for sexually transmitted infections. Meanwhile, the remaining revenue -- about 24% overall -- is used to provide cancer screenings and prevention, abortion care, other women's health care, and other services (Ross, "The Fix," Washington Post, 8/4).