Daily Women's Health Policy Report

  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
  • : preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /usr/www/users/simps90n/includes/unicode.inc on line 311.
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Syndicate content
Daily Women's Health Policy Report by the National Partnership for Women & Families
Updated: 1 hour 10 min ago

Supreme Court Inaction on Miss. TRAP Law Means State's Sole Abortion Clinic Can Remain Open

Wed, 07/01/2015 - 16:59

The Supreme Court has not taken action on a case regarding an antiabortion-rights law (HB 1390) in Mississippi, meaning the state's sole abortion clinic likely can stay open at least until October, the AP/Washington Times reports.

Supreme Court Inaction on Miss. TRAP Law Means State's Sole Abortion Clinic Can Remain Open

July 1, 2015 — The Supreme Court has not taken action on a case regarding an antiabortion-rights law (HB 1390) in Mississippi, meaning the state's sole abortion clinic likely can stay open at least until October, the AP/Washington Times reports (Wagster Pettus, AP/Washington Times, 6/30).

Background

The law requires that physicians performing abortions in Mississippi have admitting privileges at nearby hospitals. The physicians at Jackson Women's Health Organization sought admitting privileges at multiple hospitals but were denied, prompting the state to order the clinic to close for violating the law.

In July 2014, a three-judge panel of the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled in a 2-1 decision that the law would have illegally shifted Mississippi's constitutional obligations to other states by eliminating abortion access inside the state. The ruling did not overturn the law or assess whether the admitting privileges requirement is a justified safety measure. Rather, the ruling preserved an existing stay against the law and left the lower courts to consider the measure under the now-clarified principle of state responsibility.

In August 2014, Mississippi's attorney general asked the full 5th Circuit to review the panel's ruling. The full circuit declined to do so in November 2014, meaning the law remains on hold for now and Jackson Women's Health Organization can remain open while the underlying lawsuit proceeds.

Attorneys representing Jackson Women's Health Organization in April filed a brief asking the Supreme Court to dismiss the state's case in defense of the law (Women's Health Policy Report, 4/24).

Supreme Court Justices Could Decide To Act on Case This Fall

The Supreme Court on Tuesday did not issue an order on the case. According to the AP/Times, the high court will next meet in September to decide which cases it will review in the term that begins in October.

Until then, the high court's inaction on the Mississippi case means that the lower court ruling blocking the law temporarily will remain in place (AP/Washington Times, 6/30).


Supreme Court Orders 4th Circuit To Review Decision Barring N.C. Antiabortion-Rights License Plates

Wed, 07/01/2015 - 16:59

The Supreme Court on Monday ordered the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to reassess its 2014 decision that barred North Carolina from issuing "Choose Life" license plates without also offering plates featuring messages in support of abortion rights, AP/U-T San Diego reports.

Supreme Court Orders 4th Circuit To Review Decision Barring N.C. Antiabortion-Rights License Plates

July 1, 2015 — The Supreme Court on Monday ordered the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to reassess its 2014 decision that barred North Carolina from issuing "Choose Life" license plates without also offering plates featuring messages in support of abortion rights, AP/U-T San Diego reports (AP/U-T San Diego, 6/29).

Background

In 2011, state lawmakers approved the antiabortion-rights plates but rejected proposals for plates with messages backing abortion rights. For each "Choose Life" plate sold, $15 would go to not-for-profit crisis pregnancy centers that oppose abortion rights. However, the state never manufactured any of the plates because of the legal dispute (Women's Health Policy Report, 7/16/14).

The American Civil Liberties Union filed suit over the plates (Burns, WRAL News, 6/29). In February 2014, the 4th Circuit agreed with a lower court ruling that it is unconstitutional for North Carolina to offer antiabortion-rights license plates because the state does not also offer plates that support abortion rights.

Although North Carolina Attorney General Roy Cooper (D) defended the law in federal court, he declined to appeal the 4th Circuit ruling. In an email to then-North Carolina House Speaker Thom Tillis (R) and state Senate Majority Leader Phil Berger (R) last April, Chief Deputy Attorney General Grayson Kelley urged the lawmakers not to pursue further appeals. Instead, Kelley asked Tillis and Berger to draft new legislation "as an efficient way to resolve the issues."

However, in July 2014, state legislators who oppose abortion rights petitioned the Supreme Court to review the 4th Circuit ruling (Women's Health Policy Report, 7/16/14).

Order Details, Implications

According to WRAL News, the Supreme Court ordered the 4th Circuit to review its decision in light of another recent ruling from the high court concerning Texas license plates (WRAL News, 6/29).

In that case, the justices ruled in a 5-4 decision that Texas can refuse to issue license plates with the Confederate flag, on the basis that plates are government property and do not have to offer opposing viewpoints (AP/U-T San Diego, 6/29).

Chris Brook, legal director for ACLU of North Carolina, said, "The court's decision [in the North Carolina case] could allow states to censor private speech and discriminate against citizens who hold views that are different from the government's. The General Assembly should do the right thing and allow citizens on both sides of the debate to purchase specialty plates supporting their views" (WRAL News, 6/29).


Fla. Mandatory Delay Takes Effect After State Appeals Temporary Injunction

Wed, 07/01/2015 - 16:59

A Florida law (HB 633) that imposes a 24-hour mandatory delay before an abortion took effect on Wednesday after the state on Tuesday appealed an injunction that would have otherwise temporarily halted the legislation, the Palm Beach Post reports.

Fla. Mandatory Delay Takes Effect After State Appeals Temporary Injunction

July 1, 2015 — A Florida law (HB 633) that imposes a 24-hour mandatory delay before an abortion took effect on Wednesday after the state on Tuesday appealed an injunction that would have otherwise temporarily halted the legislation, the Palm Beach Post reports (Stapleton, Palm Beach Post, 6/30).

Law Details

The law requires a woman to meet in person with a physician at least 24 hours prior to having an abortion. Florida already requires women to receive counseling from a physician prior to the procedure.

The law was amended to waive the delay for women who are survivors of rape, incest, human trafficking or domestic violence. However, the exemptions only will be provided if women can produce certain documentation, such as medical records, police reports or restraining orders.

Legal Challenge

One day after Gov. Rick Scott (R) signed the bill in June, the Center for Reproductive Rights, the American Civil Liberties Union and ACLU of Florida filed a suit in state court to block the law (Women's Health Policy Report, 6/11).

In the lawsuit, the plaintiffs listed several potential violations of the right to privacy guaranteed in the Florida constitution, noting that the need for privacy is particularly important for women in abusive relationships, as they "often are carefully monitored and have limited unaccounted for time." Further, they noted that the law's documentation requirement violated the privacy rights of rape, incest and human trafficking survivors (Palm Beach Post, 6/30).

Injunction Details

On Tuesday, Leon County Circuit Judge Charles Francis granted a temporary injunction that would have stopped the law from taking effect (Palm Beach Post, 6/30).

In granting the injunction, he wrote that state officials had not provided evidence demonstrating why the law is not a burden on privacy rights. Further, he said similar laws in other states were not relevant to the case because Florida has established a broader right to privacy than other states (WPBF News, 7/1).

He wrote, "After an evidentiary hearing, the court has no evidence in front of it in which to make any factual determination that a 24-hour waiting period with the accompanying second trip necessitated by the same is not an additional burden on a woman's right to privacy" (AP/Tampa Tribune, 7/1).

Injunction Blocked

Shortly after Francis issued the injunction, Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi's (R) office filed a notice that it would appeal the measure. According to the Post, the legal action immediately stayed the injunction, which meant that the law was allowed to take effect as scheduled.

ACLU and CRR asked the judge to lift the stay and reinstate the injunction blocking the law. However, as of Tuesday evening, the stay has not been lifted (Palm Beach Post, 6/30).

Comments

Nancy Abudu, legal director at ACLU of Florida, praised the temporary injunction. "We are very pleased that the court saw this law for what it is: an unconstitutional attack on the right of Florida women to make their own choices about their healthcare, including abortion," she said (AP/Tampa Tribune, 7/1).

Meanwhile, Mona Reis, founder and CEO of the Presidential Women's Center in West Palm Beach, expressed disappointment about the blocked injunction. "I'm so disheartened by this -- so angry and upset for our patients," she said, adding, "There is no reason for this except extreme, extreme motivation by [the] state to make abortion difficult for patients" (Palm Beach Post, 6/30).


Supreme Court Inaction on Miss. TRAP Law Means State's Sole Abortion Clinic Can Remain Open

Wed, 07/01/2015 - 14:36

The Supreme Court has not taken action on a case regarding an antiabortion-rights law (HB 1390) in Mississippi, meaning the state's sole abortion clinic likely can stay open at least until October, the AP/Washington Times reports.

Supreme Court Inaction on Miss. TRAP Law Means State's Sole Abortion Clinic Can Remain Open

July 1, 2015 — The Supreme Court has not taken action on a case regarding an antiabortion-rights law (HB 1390) in Mississippi, meaning the state's sole abortion clinic likely can stay open at least until October, the AP/Washington Times reports (Wagster Pettus, AP/Washington Times, 6/30).

Background

The law requires that physicians performing abortions in Mississippi have admitting privileges at nearby hospitals. The physicians at Jackson Women's Health Organization sought admitting privileges at multiple hospitals but were denied, prompting the state to order the clinic to close for violating the law.

In July 2014, a three-judge panel of the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled in a 2-1 decision that the law would have illegally shifted Mississippi's constitutional obligations to other states by eliminating abortion access inside the state. The ruling did not overturn the law or assess whether the admitting privileges requirement is a justified safety measure. Rather, the ruling preserved an existing stay against the law and left the lower courts to consider the measure under the now-clarified principle of state responsibility.

In August 2014, Mississippi's attorney general asked the full 5th Circuit to review the panel's ruling. The full circuit declined to do so in November 2014, meaning the law remains on hold for now and Jackson Women's Health Organization can remain open while the underlying lawsuit proceeds.

Attorneys representing Jackson Women's Health Organization in April filed a brief asking the Supreme Court to dismiss the state's case in defense of the law (Women's Health Policy Report, 4/24).

Supreme Court Justices Could Decide To Act on Case This Fall

The Supreme Court on Tuesday did not issue an order on the case. According to the AP/Times, the high court will next meet in September to decide which cases it will review in the term that begins in October.

Until then, the high court's inaction on the Mississippi case means that the lower court ruling blocking the law temporarily will remain in place (AP/Washington Times, 6/30).


Women's Health Policy Report Will Not Publish on July 2, 3

Wed, 07/01/2015 - 14:33

The Women's Health Policy Report will not publish on Thursday, July 2, as well as Friday, July 3, in observance of Independence Day. The report resumes publication on Monday, July 6.

Women's Health Policy Report Will Not Publish on July 2, 3

July 1, 2015 — The Women's Health Policy Report will not publish on Thursday, July 2, as well as Friday, July 3, in observance of Independence Day. The report resumes publication on Monday, July 6.

Fla. Mandatory Delay Takes Effect After State Appeals Temporary Injunction

Wed, 07/01/2015 - 14:25

A Florida law (HB 633) that imposes a 24-hour mandatory delay before an abortion took effect on Wednesday after the state on Tuesday appealed an injunction that would have otherwise temporarily halted the legislation, the Palm Beach Post reports.

Fla. Mandatory Delay Takes Effect After State Appeals Temporary Injunction

July 1, 2015 — A Florida law (HB 633) that imposes a 24-hour mandatory delay before an abortion took effect on Wednesday after the state on Tuesday appealed an injunction that would have otherwise temporarily halted the legislation, the Palm Beach Post reports (Stapleton, Palm Beach Post, 6/30).

Law Details

The law requires a woman to meet in person with a physician at least 24 hours prior to having an abortion. Florida already requires women to receive counseling from a physician prior to the procedure.

The law was amended to waive the delay for women who are survivors of rape, incest, human trafficking or domestic violence. However, the exemptions only will be provided if women can produce certain documentation, such as medical records, police reports or restraining orders.

Legal Challenge

One day after Gov. Rick Scott (R) signed the bill in June, the Center for Reproductive Rights, the American Civil Liberties Union and ACLU of Florida filed a suit in state court to block the law (Women's Health Policy Report, 6/11).

In the lawsuit, the plaintiffs listed several potential violations of the right to privacy guaranteed in the Florida constitution, noting that the need for privacy is particularly important for women in abusive relationships, as they "often are carefully monitored and have limited unaccounted for time." Further, they noted that the law's documentation requirement violated the privacy rights of rape, incest and human trafficking survivors (Palm Beach Post, 6/30).

Injunction Details

On Tuesday, Leon County Circuit Judge Charles Francis granted a temporary injunction that would have stopped the law from taking effect (Palm Beach Post, 6/30).

In granting the injunction, he wrote that state officials had not provided evidence demonstrating why the law is not a burden on privacy rights. Further, he said similar laws in other states were not relevant to the case because Florida has established a broader right to privacy than other states (WPBF News, 7/1).

He wrote, "After an evidentiary hearing, the court has no evidence in front of it in which to make any factual determination that a 24-hour waiting period with the accompanying second trip necessitated by the same is not an additional burden on a woman's right to privacy" (AP/Tampa Tribune, 7/1).

Injunction Blocked

Shortly after Francis issued the injunction, Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi's (R) office filed a notice that it would appeal the measure. According to the Post, the legal action immediately stayed the injunction, which meant that the law was allowed to take effect as scheduled.

ACLU and CRR asked the judge to lift the stay and reinstate the injunction blocking the law. However, as of Tuesday evening, the stay has not been lifted (Palm Beach Post, 6/30).

Comments

Nancy Abudu, legal director at ACLU of Florida, praised the temporary injunction. "We are very pleased that the court saw this law for what it is: an unconstitutional attack on the right of Florida women to make their own choices about their healthcare, including abortion," she said (AP/Tampa Tribune, 7/1).

Meanwhile, Mona Reis, founder and CEO of the Presidential Women's Center in West Palm Beach, expressed disappointment about the blocked injunction. "I'm so disheartened by this -- so angry and upset for our patients," she said, adding, "There is no reason for this except extreme, extreme motivation by [the] state to make abortion difficult for patients" (Palm Beach Post, 6/30).


Supreme Court Orders 4th Circuit To Review Decision Barring N.C. Antiabortion-Rights License Plates

Wed, 07/01/2015 - 13:49

The Supreme Court on Monday ordered the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to reassess its 2014 decision that barred North Carolina from issuing "Choose Life" license plates without also offering plates featuring messages in support of abortion rights, AP/U-T San Diego reports.

Supreme Court Orders 4th Circuit To Review Decision Barring N.C. Antiabortion-Rights License Plates

July 1, 2015 — The Supreme Court on Monday ordered the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to reassess its 2014 decision that barred North Carolina from issuing "Choose Life" license plates without also offering plates featuring messages in support of abortion rights, AP/U-T San Diego reports (AP/U-T San Diego, 6/29).

Background

In 2011, state lawmakers approved the antiabortion-rights plates but rejected proposals for plates with messages backing abortion rights. For each "Choose Life" plate sold, $15 would go to not-for-profit crisis pregnancy centers that oppose abortion rights. However, the state never manufactured any of the plates because of the legal dispute (Women's Health Policy Report, 7/16/14).

The American Civil Liberties Union filed suit over the plates (Burns, WRAL News, 6/29). In February 2014, the 4th Circuit agreed with a lower court ruling that it is unconstitutional for North Carolina to offer antiabortion-rights license plates because the state does not also offer plates that support abortion rights.

Although North Carolina Attorney General Roy Cooper (D) defended the law in federal court, he declined to appeal the 4th Circuit ruling. In an email to then-North Carolina House Speaker Thom Tillis (R) and state Senate Majority Leader Phil Berger (R) last April, Chief Deputy Attorney General Grayson Kelley urged the lawmakers not to pursue further appeals. Instead, Kelley asked Tillis and Berger to draft new legislation "as an efficient way to resolve the issues."

However, in July 2014, state legislators who oppose abortion rights petitioned the Supreme Court to review the 4th Circuit ruling (Women's Health Policy Report, 7/16/14).

Order Details, Implications

According to WRAL News, the Supreme Court ordered the 4th Circuit to review its decision in light of another recent ruling from the high court concerning Texas license plates (WRAL News, 6/29).

In that case, the justices ruled in a 5-4 decision that Texas can refuse to issue license plates with the Confederate flag, on the basis that plates are government property and do not have to offer opposing viewpoints (AP/U-T San Diego, 6/29).

Chris Brook, legal director for ACLU of North Carolina, said, "The court's decision [in the North Carolina case] could allow states to censor private speech and discriminate against citizens who hold views that are different from the government's. The General Assembly should do the right thing and allow citizens on both sides of the debate to purchase specialty plates supporting their views" (WRAL News, 6/29).


SCOTUS: Religious Not-for-Profits Exempt From Contraceptive Coverage Rules, Pending Appeal

Wed, 07/01/2015 - 13:46

The Supreme Court on Monday issued an order that says certain not-for-profits that hold themselves out as religious are exempt from following the federal contraceptive coverage rules while the court considers whether to hear an appeal of a lower court ruling on the issue, the New York Times reports.

SCOTUS: Religious Not-for-Profits Exempt From Contraceptive Coverage Rules, Pending Appeal

July 1, 2015 — The Supreme Court on Monday issued an order that says certain not-for-profits that hold themselves out as religious are exempt from following the federal contraceptive coverage rules while the court considers whether to hear an appeal of a lower court ruling on the issue, the New York Times reports (Pear, New York Times, 6/29).

Background

Not-for-profits that hold themselves out as religious are able to receive accommodations for meeting the Affordable Care Act's (PL 111-148) contraceptive coverage rules for employers. The accommodation aims to ensure that enrollees in health plans for not-for-profits that hold themselves out as religious and oppose contraception still have access to contraceptive coverage benefits under the ACA. The accommodation enables such not-for-profits to notify their insurer or third-party administrator of their objection so the insurer or third-party administrator can facilitate contraceptive coverage for members of their health plans.

Lawsuit Details

In separate lawsuits filed in 2013, Geneva College -- an institution affiliated with the Reformed Presbyterian Church -- and the Catholic Dioceses of Pittsburgh and Erie, along with their affiliated schools and charities, challenged the accommodation as inadequate. Separate courts granted Geneva College a preliminary injunction and the dioceses a permanent injunction. The Department of Justice in February 2014 then appealed both cases to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 3rd Circuit.

In February, a three-judge panel for the 3rd Circuit unanimously ruled that "the accommodation places no substantial burden on the appellees." As a result, the panel found that the accommodation does not violate the Religious Freedom Restoration Act (PL 103-141).

In March, the Catholic Diocese of Erie asked the full 3rd Circuit to review the panel's decision, but the appeal was denied. The Catholic Dioceses then appealed the case to the Supreme Court (Women's Health Policy Report, 6/2).


Featured Blogs

Tue, 06/30/2015 - 18:29

(Usova, "Speak Freely," American Civil Liberties Union, 6/26); Culp-Ressler, ("ThinkProgress," Center for American Progress, 6/29); (Denniston, SCOTUSblog, 6/29).

June 30, 2015

FEATURED BLOG

"2 Sneaky Ways Women's Rights Are Being Threatened Right Now," Georgeanne Usova, American Civil Liberties Union's "Speak Freely": "Two harmful new policy riders" in separate House spending bills "make ... crystal clear" that House lawmakers are "discriminating against women in the name of religious liberty," Usova writes. She explains that one budget bill rider, a "sweeping provision called the Health Care Conscience Rights Act ... would allow any employer or insurance company to deny health insurance coverage for any health care service they have a religious or moral objection to, even if it's required by law," including "mental health screenings, vaccines, or tests for cervical cancer, HIV, or Type 2 Diabetes." Further, she notes that the provision "would also expand and entrench an existing policy rider called the Weldon Amendment that already obstructs women's access to abortion care, with language that could allow health care providers to deny patients basic services and information about their health and treatment options and would open the door to frivolous lawsuits." Meanwhile, Usova writes that the same House committee that approved that budget bill also "voted to add language to another funding bill that would block a [Washington, D.C.,] nondiscrimination law [Act 20-593] that protects employees in the nation's capital from workplace discrimination based on their reproductive health care decisions." Usova adds, "Both spending bills, riders included, are now poised for the House floor" (Usova, "Speak Freely," American Civil Liberties Union, 6/26).

FEATURED BLOG

"This State's Attempt To 'Regulate Abortion Out of Existence' Is Flying Under the Radar," Culp-Ressler, Center for American Progress' "ThinkProgress": Ohio lawmakers "have pursued a successful incremental strategy that helps their attacks on abortion fly under the radar" and side-step national attention, Culp-Ressler writes. Comparing Ohio abortion restrictions to those passed in Texas, she notes that Ohio lawmakers are "currently making similar attempts to restrict the procedure and shutter clinics" via "several complex provisions to the state budget [HB 64]." According to Culp-Ressler, the 2013 state budget (HB 59) included a provision "requiring abortion clinics to have 'transfer agreements' with private hospitals," which frequently "are Catholic-affiliated and won't partner with abortion providers on religious grounds." She explains that while clinics "unable to get a transfer agreement ... can apply for a waiver through the Ohio Department of Health," the department "has been stacked with several anti-abortion activists" and has used the process to close down "half of the state's abortion clinics" since the law took effect. "Now, the new budget seeks to make this process even more difficult for clinics" by "stipulat[ing] that 'transfer agreements' are only valid if the hospital is within 30 miles of the clinic" and "ensur[ing] that applications for waivers are automatically denied after 60 days," she writes. Further, Culp-Ressler adds that state lawmakers "have also been advancing a 20-week abortion ban" (Culp-Ressler, "ThinkProgress," Center for American Progress, 6/29).

FEATURED BLOG

"Court Blocks Texas Abortion Law," Lyle Denniston, SCOTUSblog: "Splitting five to four, the Supreme Court on Monday afternoon temporarily blocked Texas from enforcing two new requirements that abortion clinic operators say will force many of them to close," Denniston writes. Specifically, the order temporarily blocks provisions of Texas' antiabortion-rights law (HB 2) that would have "require[d] all doctors performing abortions in the state to have the right to send patients to a nearby hospital" and "require[d] all abortion clinics in the state to have facilities equal to a surgical center," he writes. According to Denniston, the rules were upheld by the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals and were scheduled to take effect on Wednesday." He notes that "the Justices did not explain why they were postponing the law" and "the order will be lifted" if the high court later decides not to review the provisions. However, "if review is granted," the order "will stay in effect until a final ruling emerges." Meanwhile, he notes that the high court has not yet decided whether it will review a separate case involving an admitting privileges requirement (HB 1390) in Mississippi (Denniston, SCOTUSblog, 6/29).

Editorial Calls on Iowa Board of Medicine To Base Rules on 'Evidence, Not Politics'

Tue, 06/30/2015 - 18:23

The Iowa Board of Medicine's "ultimate goal is to help protect the health and safety of Iowans," but several board members in 2013 instead passed "an administrative rule crafted by anti-abortion activists ... to eliminate a safe, time-tested, telemedicine system connecting doctors with patients seeking" medication abortion, a Des Moines Register editorial states.

Editorial Calls on Iowa Board of Medicine To Base Rules on 'Evidence, Not Politics'

June 30, 2015 — The Iowa Board of Medicine's "ultimate goal is to help protect the health and safety of Iowans," but several board members in 2013 instead passed "an administrative rule crafted by anti-abortion activists ... to eliminate a safe, time-tested, telemedicine system connecting doctors with patients seeking" medication abortion, a Des Moines Register editorial states.

According to the editorial, the state Supreme Court "has now deemed that rule unconstitutional." As a result, women in the state, "particularly those in rural areas, will continue to have access to an FDA-approved drug that has been used around the world for decades" for medication abortion.

However, the editorial contends that the "remaining board members who voted to approve the administrative rule two years ago should resign." According to the editorial, the board in approving the rule did not aim "to protect the health of women" but instead sought "to prevent women from exercising their right to an abortion."

The editorial urges Iowa Gov. Terry Branstad (R) to "appoint replacements who understand the professional, non-political nature of a state board." Afterward, the board "should work to restore the public's confidence by focusing only on patient safety" and "undo the damage done [by] fixating on pursuing a political agenda while contaminating a larger public discussion in [Iowa] about safely using telemedicine for other health services," the editorial states.

The editorial concludes, "Members who don't understand that" the board "should make decisions about standards of care based on evidence, not politics" should not serve on the panel (Des Moines Register, 6/27).


Neb. Women Face Additional Abortion Care Barriers Amid Provider Shortage

Tue, 06/30/2015 - 18:23

The retirement of a longtime doctor at Planned Parenthood of the Heartland has made it more difficult to access and schedule abortions in Nebraska, World-Herald Bureau/Norfolk Daily News reports.

Neb. Women Face Additional Abortion Care Barriers Amid Provider Shortage

June 30, 2015 — The retirement of a longtime doctor at Planned Parenthood of the Heartland has made it more difficult to access and schedule abortions in Nebraska, World-Herald Bureau/Norfolk Daily News reports.

Shortages in Abortion Care Providers

According to the Bureau/Daily News, PPH has been seeking a physician and an associate medical director for its clinics in the state for several years. One physician, C.J. LaBenz, temporarily came out of retirement to help fill the gap in care, but he decided to retire again in March of this year.

Following his departure, PPH temporarily had to stop offering abortion care at its Lincoln clinic and curb abortion services at another clinic in Omaha. Women seeking medication abortion were referred to the organization's Council Bluffs clinic, and those seeking surgical abortions were referred to PPH's Des Moines clinic. According to Angie Remington, a spokesperson for PPH, grant money was used to help low-income patients cover transportation-related costs.

Currently, the Lincoln and Omaha clinics offer abortion services five days per month, down from eight. However, neither clinic has a physician on staff who can regularly offer abortion care. The part-time abortion care is provided by a physician, Nicola Moore, who flies into the state for a few days per month, and Jill Meadows, medical director of PPH.

Remington said appointments are filling up more quickly because of the shortage. "It has been challenging to meet the need for abortion services at our Nebraska health centers," she said, adding, "We are booking out two weeks in advance."

Challenges Finding Physicians

Vicki Saporta, president and CEO of the National Abortion Federation, noted that while there is not a nationwide shortage of abortion providers, they tend to be distributed unevenly throughout the U.S. According to Saporta, there are fewer providers in rural areas and in states that have restrictive abortion laws and in areas where providers face antiabortion-rights harassment, such as Nebraska.

"Nebraska has been fairly hostile to abortion providers and to abortion care in many ways," she said, noting that the state was the first to implement a 20-week abortion ban and has barred telemedicine for medication abortion. Further, she noted that another provider in the state -- LeRoy Carhart, who runs an abortion clinic in Bellevue -- has faced continued harassment from abortion-rights opponents (Stoddard, World-Herald Bureau/Norfolk Daily News, 6/28).


Supreme Court Blocks HB 2, Allows Clinics To Remain Open While Appeal Pends

Tue, 06/30/2015 - 17:57

The Supreme Court on Monday voted 5-4 to temporarily block certain provisions in a Texas omnibus antiabortion-rights law (HB 2) from taking effect, allowing the remaining clinics in the state to stay open until the high court decides whether to review the case, the New York Times reports.

Supreme Court Blocks HB 2, Allows Clinics To Remain Open While Appeal Pends

June 30, 2015 — The Supreme Court on Monday voted 5-4 to temporarily block certain provisions in a Texas omnibus antiabortion-rights law (HB 2) from taking effect, allowing the remaining clinics in the state to stay open until the high court decides whether to review the case, the New York Times reports (Liptak/Fernandez, New York Times, 6/29).

A lower court ruling to uphold parts of the law was scheduled to take effect on July 1. If they had taken effect, about 50% of the remaining abortion clinics in the state could have been at risk of closing.

Background

The case centers on a provision in the law that requires abortion clinics in the state to meet the same building standards as ambulatory surgical centers. The case also involves whether abortion facilities in El Paso and McAllen should be exempt from a separate provision in the law that requires abortion providers to have admitting privileges at nearby hospitals.

Earlier this month, the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that the state had a "legitimate" purpose in implementing the legislation. Specifically, the court upheld the law's ambulatory surgical centers provision and admitting privileges requirements except in the case of one clinic, Whole Woman's Health in McAllen, Texas.

The Center for Reproductive Rights, which represents the abortion providers, on June 11 asked the 5th Circuit to stay the decision while the clinics appeal to the Supreme Court. The 5th Circuit rejected the request. CRR then filed an emergency request with the Supreme Court to stay the lower court ruling and allow the clinics to remain open pending CRR's appeal (Women's Health Policy Report, 6/22).

Order Details

According to the AP/Sacramento Bee, the Supreme Court order temporarily blocks HB 2's ambulatory surgical center requirement from taking effect until the high court decides whether to review the case. Abortion-rights opponents and supporters currently are assessing whether the order also blocks the admitting privileges requirement (Sherman/Vertuno, AP/Sacramento Bee, 6/29).

The high court is not expected to release a decision before the fall. However, according to AP/ABC 13 Eyewitness News, the Supreme Court's order to block the law indicates that it is likely the justices will agree to review the overall case.

Meanwhile, the high court has yet to issue a decision about whether it will review a separate case involving an admitting privileges requirement (HB 1390) in Mississippi (AP/ABC 13 Eyewitness News, 6/29).

Implications for Providers

Providers in Texas are assessing whether the order will allow some clinics that have already shut down under the law to reopen, although providers caution that reopening the clinics might pose difficulties, the AP/Sacramento Bee reports.

Amy Hagstrom Miller -- CEO of Whole Woman's Health, one of the plaintiffs -- noted that reopening the clinics in Austin and Beaumont, which closed under the law's building requirements, would require new licensure, staff and equipment, all of which would necessitate fundraising. She noted that it would be difficult to fundraise if the centers still risk closure under the law, saying, "Reopening a clinic without knowing how long is very unpredictable ... But the need is still there" (AP/Sacramento Bee, 6/29).

Meanwhile, CRR attorney Stephanie Toti said some of the clinics that were closed under the law's admitting privileges requirement also might be able to reopen (AP/ABC 13 Eyewitness News, 6/29). However, she noted that while clinics are "hopeful" about reopening, "some of those clinics have been closed for so long" (AP/Sacramento Bee, 6/29).

Comments

Hagstrom Miller praised the high court's ruling, saying, "We're relieved that the high court has, once again, prevented anti-choice politicians from pushing safe and affordable abortion care entirely out of reach for Texas women."

Meanwhile, CRR President and CEO Nancy Northup urged the Supreme Court to review the case. "This case presents a very, very dramatic impact in the type of restrictions on access to abortion clinics that we've seen over the past few years," she said, adding, "If this case is not taken by the Supreme Court, it's going to allow a continuation of the closing of clinics by these sneaky, underhanded methods" (New York Times, 6/29).

Cecile Richards, president of Planned Parenthood Action Fund, said, "We are grateful the Supreme Court has stepped in to protect women's access to safe, legal abortion, for now." She added, "This dangerous law never should have passed in the first place -- which is why we need to elect leaders who will champion women's health and rights" (PPAF press release, 6/29).

Separately, Gov. Greg Abbott (R) and Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick (R) expressed disappointment with the ruling (New York Times, 6/29).


Blogs Comment on Using Drones To Advance Repro Rights, Repro Health Restrictions in Federal Budget Bills, More

Tue, 06/30/2015 - 16:34

Read the week's best commentary from bloggers at RH Reality Check, American Civil Liberties Union's "Speak Freely" and more.

Blogs Comment on Using Drones To Advance Repro Rights, Repro Health Restrictions in Federal Budget Bills, More

June 30, 2015 — Read the week's best commentary from bloggers at RH Reality Check, American Civil Liberties Union's "Speak Freely" and more.

ABORTION-RIGHTS MOVEMENT: "What the 'Abortion Drone' Will (And Won't) Mean for Reproductive Rights (Updated)," Emily Crockett, RH Reality Check: Crockett interviews Rebecca Gomperts, founder and director of Women on Waves, to clear up some "misinformation and anxiety" about the group's successful delivery of medication abortion from Germany to Poland via drone last week. In the interview, Gomperts explained that the drone delivered medication abortion directly to women in need without any intermediary involvement, which protected women's groups that participated in the action from Poland's "restrictive abortion laws." Gomperts added that the "drone's mission" was to "provid[e] a few women access to needed services, and rais[e] awareness about the social injustices of illegal abortion," Crockett writes. She adds that, according to Gomperts, "That awareness serves both to inform women that they have the power to safely terminate their own pregnancies ... and to put pressure on governments to change their draconian anti-choice policies." Meanwhile, Crockett notes that while some abortion-rights supporters in other countries have expressed concerns about the technology being used where abortion access is banned or restricted, Gomperts clarified that Women on Waves consults with local abortion-rights groups before implementing any operation. According to Crockett, Gomperts also added that "she hopes [the drone technology] might give a boost of positive energy to activists who are burned out by relentless attacks on women's human rights" (Crockett, RH Reality Check, 6/29).

FEDERAL BUDGET PROPOSALS: "2 Sneaky Ways Women's Rights Are Being Threatened Right Now," Georgeanne Usova, American Civil Liberties Union's "Speak Freely": "Two harmful new policy riders" in separate House spending bills "make ... crystal clear" that House lawmakers are "discriminating against women in the name of religious liberty," Usova writes. She explains that one budget bill rider, a "sweeping provision called the Health Care Conscience Rights Act ... would allow any employer or insurance company to deny health insurance coverage for any health care service they have a religious or moral objection to, even if it's required by law," including "mental health screenings, vaccines, or tests for cervical cancer, HIV, or Type 2 Diabetes." Further, she notes that the provision "would also expand and entrench an existing policy rider called the Weldon Amendment that already obstructs women's access to abortion care, with language that could allow health care providers to deny patients basic services and information about their health and treatment options and would open the door to frivolous lawsuits." Meanwhile, Usova writes that the same House committee that approved that budget bill also "voted to add language to another funding bill that would block a [Washington, D.C.,] nondiscrimination law [Act 20-593] that protects employees in the nation's capital from workplace discrimination based on their reproductive health care decisions." Usova adds, "Both spending bills, riders included, are now poised for the House floor" (Usova, "Speak Freely," American Civil Liberties Union, 6/26).

CONTRACEPTION: "Meet The Man Who's Asking The Internet To Help Him Develop Male Contraception," Tara Culp-Ressler, Center for American Progress' "ThinkProgress": Culp-Ressler writes about the Male Contraception Initiative, "the only organization in the U.S. 'whose primary purpose is to promote the development of new male contraceptives.'" According to Culp-Ressler, the group earlier this month "launched its first crowdfunding campaign to raise money for a potential birth control pill for men being developed by a Stanford University researcher," Garry Flynn, who "believes he may have found a way to target a protein that's critical in the production of sperm." Further, MCI head Aaron Hamlin believes the online campaign will also help "engage with supporters of male birth control" and dispel the "widespread misconception that men simply aren't interested in using male contraception," Culp-Ressler writes. She cites research showing that men are "dissatisf[ied] with condoms" and "about half of men report they'd take a male form of the birth control pill." Meanwhile, she writes that women also might be interested in male contraception, noting, "Some women's health advocates are hopeful that male birth control could be a way to address the current gender gap in reproductive services, arguing that men need to get more involved in pregnancy prevention efforts" (Culp-Ressler, "ThinkProgress," Center for American Progress, 6/25).

ABORTION RESTRICTIONS: "This State's Attempt To 'Regulate Abortion Out of Existence' Is Flying Under the Radar," Culp-Ressler, Center for American Progress' "ThinkProgress": Ohio lawmakers "have pursued a successful incremental strategy that helps their attacks on abortion fly under the radar" and side-step national attention, Culp-Ressler writes. Comparing Ohio abortion restrictions to those passed in Texas, she notes that Ohio lawmakers are "currently making similar attempts to restrict the procedure and shutter clinics" via "several complex provisions to the state budget [HB 64]." According to Culp-Ressler, the 2013 state budget (HB 59) included a provision "requiring abortion clinics to have 'transfer agreements' with private hospitals," which frequently "are Catholic-affiliated and won't partner with abortion providers on religious grounds." She explains that while clinics "unable to get a transfer agreement ... can apply for a waiver through the Ohio Department of Health," the department "has been stacked with several anti-abortion activists" and has used the process to close down "half of the state's abortion clinics" since the law took effect. "Now, the new budget seeks to make this process even more difficult for clinics" by "stipulat[ing] that 'transfer agreements' are only valid if the hospital is within 30 miles of the clinic" and "ensur[ing] that applications for waivers are automatically denied after 60 days," she writes. Further, Culp-Ressler adds that state lawmakers "have also been advancing a 20-week abortion ban" (Culp-Ressler, "ThinkProgress," Center for American Progress, 6/29).

SUPREME COURT: "Court Blocks Texas Abortion Law," Lyle Denniston, SCOTUSblog: "Splitting five to four, the Supreme Court on Monday afternoon temporarily blocked Texas from enforcing two new requirements that abortion clinic operators say will force many of them to close," Denniston writes. Specifically, the order temporarily blocks provisions of Texas' antiabortion-rights law (HB 2) that would have "require[d] all doctors performing abortions in the state to have the right to send patients to a nearby hospital" and "require[d] all abortion clinics in the state to have facilities equal to a surgical center," he writes. According to Denniston, the rules were upheld by the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals and were scheduled to take effect on Wednesday." He notes that "the Justices did not explain why they were postponing the law" and "the order will be lifted" if the high court later decides not to review the provisions. However, "if review is granted," the order "will stay in effect until a final ruling emerges." Meanwhile, he notes that the high court has not yet decided whether it will review a separate case involving an admitting privileges requirement (HB 1390) in Mississippi (Denniston, SCOTUSblog, 6/29).

REPRODUCTIVE JUSTICE: "Recent SNAP Restrictions Are Another Reminder That Poverty Is a Reproductive Issue," Katie Klabusich, RH Reality Check: While "the word 'choice'" is frequently used "to indicate the legal right to choose what happens to us ... the existence of a right does not ensure that those who need to exercise it will have access to it," Klabusich writes. According to Klabusich, "In order for health and true equality to be in reach for all, we must understand what poverty is, who is affected by it, and deal with our discomfort as a culture acknowledging the millions who live and struggle under its weight." She explains that, "for many people, poverty is often related to a lack of access to basic health care, including abortion," but this "burden ... is a blind spot for many legislatures and courts around the country, particularly where restrictions on abortion and other kinds of reproductive care are concerned." Klabusich writes she was "reminded of the link between health-care access and poverty yet again in the face of the justifications from the current wave of governors and state representatives proposing rules undercutting vital food assistance programs," because poverty for many individuals means "deciding between food and other necessities," such as contraception. She concludes, "Just as SNAP funding provides a lifeline to those who need it, access and funding to reproductive health care provide a basic level of bodily autonomy and the opportunity to determine one's own present and future," adding, individuals cannot be "functional, autonomous human[s] without the ability to eat, just as [they] can't be fully human and free without the ability to control if, whether, and when [they] become .. parent[s]" (Klabusich, RH Reality Check, 6/29).


Neb. Women Face Additional Abortion Care Barriers Amid Provider Shortage

Tue, 06/30/2015 - 14:58

The retirement of a longtime doctor at Planned Parenthood of the Heartland has made it more difficult to access and schedule abortions in Nebraska, World-Herald Bureau/Norfolk Daily News reports.

Neb. Women Face Additional Abortion Care Barriers Amid Provider Shortage

June 30, 2015 — The retirement of a longtime doctor at Planned Parenthood of the Heartland has made it more difficult to access and schedule abortions in Nebraska, World-Herald Bureau/Norfolk Daily News reports.

Shortages in Abortion Care Providers

According to the Bureau/Daily News, PPH has been seeking a physician and an associate medical director for its clinics in the state for several years. One physician, C.J. LaBenz, temporarily came out of retirement to help fill the gap in care, but he decided to retire again in March of this year.

Following his departure, PPH temporarily had to stop offering abortion care at its Lincoln clinic and curb abortion services at another clinic in Omaha. Women seeking medication abortion were referred to the organization's Council Bluffs clinic, and those seeking surgical abortions were referred to PPH's Des Moines clinic. According to Angie Remington, a spokesperson for PPH, grant money was used to help low-income patients cover transportation-related costs.

Currently, the Lincoln and Omaha clinics offer abortion services five days per month, down from eight. However, neither clinic has a physician on staff who can regularly offer abortion care. The part-time abortion care is provided by a physician, Nicola Moore, who flies into the state for a few days per month, and Jill Meadows, medical director of PPH.

Remington said appointments are filling up more quickly because of the shortage. "It has been challenging to meet the need for abortion services at our Nebraska health centers," she said, adding, "We are booking out two weeks in advance."

Challenges Finding Physicians

Vicki Saporta, president and CEO of the National Abortion Federation, noted that while there is not a nationwide shortage of abortion providers, they tend to be distributed unevenly throughout the U.S. According to Saporta, there are fewer providers in rural areas and in states that have restrictive abortion laws and in areas where providers face antiabortion-rights harassment, such as Nebraska.

"Nebraska has been fairly hostile to abortion providers and to abortion care in many ways," she said, noting that the state was the first to implement a 20-week abortion ban and has barred telemedicine for medication abortion. Further, she noted that another provider in the state -- LeRoy Carhart, who runs an abortion clinic in Bellevue -- has faced continued harassment from abortion-rights opponents (Stoddard, World-Herald Bureau/Norfolk Daily News, 6/28).


Supreme Court Blocks HB 2, Allows Clinics To Remain Open While Appeal Pends

Tue, 06/30/2015 - 14:55

The Supreme Court on Monday voted 5-4 to temporarily block certain provisions in a Texas omnibus antiabortion-rights law (HB 2) from taking effect, allowing the remaining clinics in the state to stay open until the high court decides whether to review the case, the New York Times reports.

Supreme Court Blocks HB 2, Allows Clinics To Remain Open While Appeal Pends

June 30, 2015 — The Supreme Court on Monday voted 5-4 to temporarily block certain provisions in a Texas omnibus antiabortion-rights law (HB 2) from taking effect, allowing the remaining clinics in the state to stay open until the high court decides whether to review the case, the New York Times reports (Liptak/Fernandez, New York Times, 6/29).

A lower court ruling to uphold parts of the law was scheduled to take effect on July 1. If they had taken effect, about 50% of the remaining abortion clinics in the state could have been at risk of closing.

Background

The case centers on a provision in the law that requires abortion clinics in the state to meet the same building standards as ambulatory surgical centers. The case also involves whether abortion facilities in El Paso and McAllen should be exempt from a separate provision in the law that requires abortion providers to have admitting privileges at nearby hospitals.

Earlier this month, the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that the state had a "legitimate" purpose in implementing the legislation. Specifically, the court upheld the law's ambulatory surgical centers provision and admitting privileges requirements except in the case of one clinic, Whole Woman's Health in McAllen, Texas.

The Center for Reproductive Rights, which represents the abortion providers, on June 11 asked the 5th Circuit to stay the decision while the clinics appeal to the Supreme Court. The 5th Circuit rejected the request. CRR then filed an emergency request with the Supreme Court to stay the lower court ruling and allow the clinics to remain open pending CRR's appeal (Women's Health Policy Report, 6/22).

Order Details

According to the AP/Sacramento Bee, the Supreme Court order temporarily blocks HB 2's ambulatory surgical center requirement from taking effect until the high court decides whether to review the case. Abortion-rights opponents and supporters currently are assessing whether the order also blocks the admitting privileges requirement (Sherman/Vertuno, AP/Sacramento Bee, 6/29).

The high court is not expected to release a decision before the fall. However, according to AP/ABC 13 Eyewitness News, the Supreme Court's order to block the law indicates that it is likely the justices will agree to review the overall case.

Meanwhile, the high court has yet to issue a decision about whether it will review a separate case involving an admitting privileges requirement (HB 1390) in Mississippi (AP/ABC 13 Eyewitness News, 6/29).

Implications for Providers

Providers in Texas are assessing whether the order will allow some clinics that have already shut down under the law to reopen, although providers caution that reopening the clinics might pose difficulties, the AP/Sacramento Bee reports.

Amy Hagstrom Miller -- CEO of Whole Woman's Health, one of the plaintiffs -- noted that reopening the clinics in Austin and Beaumont, which closed under the law's building requirements, would require new licensure, staff and equipment, all of which would necessitate fundraising. She noted that it would be difficult to fundraise if the centers still risk closure under the law, saying, "Reopening a clinic without knowing how long is very unpredictable ... But the need is still there" (AP/Sacramento Bee, 6/29).

Meanwhile, CRR attorney Stephanie Toti said some of the clinics that were closed under the law's admitting privileges requirement also might be able to reopen (AP/ABC 13 Eyewitness News, 6/29). However, she noted that while clinics are "hopeful" about reopening, "some of those clinics have been closed for so long" (AP/Sacramento Bee, 6/29).

Comments

Hagstrom Miller praised the high court's ruling, saying, "We're relieved that the high court has, once again, prevented anti-choice politicians from pushing safe and affordable abortion care entirely out of reach for Texas women."

Meanwhile, CRR President and CEO Nancy Northup urged the Supreme Court to review the case. "This case presents a very, very dramatic impact in the type of restrictions on access to abortion clinics that we've seen over the past few years," she said, adding, "If this case is not taken by the Supreme Court, it's going to allow a continuation of the closing of clinics by these sneaky, underhanded methods" (New York Times, 6/29).

Cecile Richards, president of Planned Parenthood Action Fund, said, "We are grateful the Supreme Court has stepped in to protect women's access to safe, legal abortion, for now." She added, "This dangerous law never should have passed in the first place -- which is why we need to elect leaders who will champion women's health and rights" (PPAF press release, 6/29).

Separately, Gov. Greg Abbott (R) and Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick (R) expressed disappointment with the ruling (New York Times, 6/29).


Editorial Calls on Iowa Board of Medicine To Base Rules on 'Evidence, Not Politics'

Tue, 06/30/2015 - 14:54

The Iowa Board of Medicine's "ultimate goal is to help protect the health and safety of Iowans," but several board members in 2013 instead passed "an administrative rule crafted by anti-abortion activists ... to eliminate a safe, time-tested, telemedicine system connecting doctors with patients seeking" medication abortion, a Des Moines Register editorial states.

Editorial Calls on Iowa Board of Medicine To Base Rules on 'Evidence, Not Politics'

June 30, 2015 — The Iowa Board of Medicine's "ultimate goal is to help protect the health and safety of Iowans," but several board members in 2013 instead passed "an administrative rule crafted by anti-abortion activists ... to eliminate a safe, time-tested, telemedicine system connecting doctors with patients seeking" medication abortion, a Des Moines Register editorial states.

According to the editorial, the state Supreme Court "has now deemed that rule unconstitutional." As a result, women in the state, "particularly those in rural areas, will continue to have access to an FDA-approved drug that has been used around the world for decades" for medication abortion.

However, the editorial contends that the "remaining board members who voted to approve the administrative rule two years ago should resign." According to the editorial, the board in approving the rule did not aim "to protect the health of women" but instead sought "to prevent women from exercising their right to an abortion."

The editorial urges Iowa Gov. Terry Branstad (R) to "appoint replacements who understand the professional, non-political nature of a state board." Afterward, the board "should work to restore the public's confidence by focusing only on patient safety" and "undo the damage done [by] fixating on pursuing a political agenda while contaminating a larger public discussion in [Iowa] about safely using telemedicine for other health services," the editorial states.

The editorial concludes, "Members who don't understand that" the board "should make decisions about standards of care based on evidence, not politics" should not serve on the panel (Des Moines Register, 6/27).


Ohio Officials Deny Abortion Clinic's Request for Exemption From Transfer Agreement Rules

Mon, 06/29/2015 - 18:48

The Ohio health director on Thursday denied a request from a local abortion clinic, Women's Med Center in Dayton, for an exemption from the state's transfer agreement requirement, the AP/Seattle Post-Intelligencer reports.

Ohio Officials Deny Abortion Clinic's Request for Exemption From Transfer Agreement Rules

June 29, 2015 — The Ohio health director on Thursday denied a request from a local abortion clinic, Women's Med Center in Dayton, for an exemption from the state's transfer agreement requirement, the AP/Seattle Post-Intelligencer reports (AP/Seattle Post-Intelligencer, 6/26).

Background

Under the state's 2013 budget (HB 59), abortion clinics in the state are required to obtain a transfer agreement with a private hospital. Clinics are prohibited from making such arrangements with public hospitals.

Several clinics have asked the Ohio Department of Health for a variance from the law. Women's Med filed its request two years ago (Women's Health Policy Report, 6/19). According to the AP/Post-Intelligencer, Women's Med said two physicians could provide emergency care for patients (AP/Seattle Post-Intelligencer, 6/26).

Meanwhile, state lawmakers last week approved a compromise budget that includes a provision that would require abortion clinics to arrange a patient transfer agreement with a hospital no more than 30 miles away (Women's Health Policy Report, 6/25). The compromise budget also includes a provision that requires the state health director to grant or deny clinic's variance requests within 60 days (AP/Seattle Post-Intelligencer, 6/26).

The 30-mile patient-transfer provision could affect an abortion clinic in Toledo, Capital Care Network, because it has an agreement with a hospital 50 miles away. Earlier this month, an Ohio judge overturned a 2014 Ohio Department of Health order that would have closed down the clinic because it does not have a transfer agreement with a nearby hospital (Women's Health Policy Report, 6/22).

Decision Details

Ohio Health Director Richard Hodges on Thursday denied Women's Med's request on the grounds that the clinic would not do enough to ensure patient safety.

Hodges said the clinic had 30 days to file a new request. According to the AP/Post-Intelligencer, the clinic could lose its license if it fails to file a new request (AP/Seattle Post-Intelligencer, 6/26).

Editorial Calls on Ohio Gov. To Reject Antiabortion-Rights Budget Provisions

"As they did two years ago, Ohio lawmakers want to use the new state budget to trample on women's constitutional right to safe, legal abortion," a Toledo Blade editorial states.

According to the editorial, if the proposed budget's "medically unsupported anti-abortion provisions become law, they almost certainly would shut down the only clinic that performs abortions in Toledo." The editorial urges Gov. John Kasich (R) to "use his line-item veto to reject these extreme measures," including the budget's transfer-agreement provision.

According to the editorial, "[m]edical authorities overwhelmingly agree that transfer agreements aren't necessary because abortion is one of the safest medical procedures." State lawmakers who oppose abortion rights "know this requirement has no basis in medicine," but they are using it "to shut down abortion clinics across the state," the editorial states.

Further, the editorial notes that state lawmakers are inserting the provision in the state budget to make "irrelevant" a recent court decision to keep the Toledo clinic open. In that decision, a Lucas County judge "argu[ed] that state law is inconsistent with the constitutional right to end an unwanted pregnancy upheld by the U.S. Supreme Court."

Meanwhile, the proposed budget also includes a provision "that would reject requests for variances that permit abortion clinics to stay open if the state does not approve such variances within two months," the editorial continues. According to the editorial, the "new measure could shut down clinics in Dayton and Cincinnati, and make Cincinnati the largest metropolitan area in the country with no abortion provider."

"The governor knows that the General Assembly's anti-abortion extremism is out of step with Ohioans' preferences and with women's constitutional rights," the editorial states. The editorial calls on Kasich to reject the provisions "and affirm women's right to make their own health-care choices" (Toledo Blade, 6/28).


Judge Temporarily Blocks Tenn. Law, Allows Two Abortion Clinics To Stay Open

Mon, 06/29/2015 - 18:48

A federal judge in Nashville on Friday temporarily blocked a Tennessee law (SB 1280) from taking effect this week that would require abortion clinics in the state to be licensed as ambulatory surgical centers, allowing two clinics to remain open, Reuters reports.

Judge Temporarily Blocks Tenn. Law, Allows Two Abortion Clinics To Stay Open

June 29, 2015 — A federal judge in Nashville on Friday temporarily blocked a Tennessee law (SB 1280) from taking effect this week that would require abortion clinics in the state to be licensed as ambulatory surgical centers, allowing two clinics to remain open, Reuters reports (Wisniewski/Bailey, Reuters, 6/26).

U.S. District Judge Kevin Sharp, who granted the preliminary injunction against the law, will decide whether to extend the delay at a July 9 hearing (Wadhwani, Tennessean, 6/26).

Background

The law, which was scheduled to take effect on July 1, will require all facilities or physician offices that perform more than 50 surgical abortions annually to be licensed as ambulatory surgical centers.

Four of the six abortion clinics in the state that provide surgical abortions currently meet the licensing standards, while a fifth provider, in Knoxville, only provides medication abortion and is, therefore, not subject to the requirement. Bristol Regional Women's Center and the Women's Center in Nashville are the two remaining clinics that provide surgical abortions and are not licensed as ambulatory surgical centers.

Lawsuit Details

The Center for Reproductive Rights earlier this month filed a lawsuit against three antiabortion-rights laws, including the ambulatory surgical licensing requirement, in Tennessee on behalf of three abortion clinics and an ob-gyn in the state.

CRR filed suit on behalf of Bristol Regional Women's Center; the Women's Center in Nashville; CHOICES, the Memphis Center for Reproductive Health; and Wesley Adams, an ob-gyn who provides abortion care at the Bristol and Nashville clinics. CRR asked the court to block the ambulatory surgical center requirement while the lawsuit against all three laws continues.

According to lawsuit, the Bristol and Nashville clinics risk closure because they do not meet the ambulatory surgical center standards. The plaintiffs said the state Department of Health blocked their efforts to comply with the law by not making the necessary application available until June 16 and then refusing to process the submitted applications until the clinics also provided renovation plans, finished the renovations and had the renovations pass state inspection. They said the requirements "could not possibly be completed" in the 15-day timespan between the application being made available and July 1, when the law was scheduled to take effect (Women's Health Policy Report, 6/26).

Latest Ruling

Sharp granted a preliminary injunction, ruling in his order that "[i]t is simply not possible to complete this [clinic licensing] process in the time available before the law takes effect" (Reuters, 6/26). He also cited the "harm ... [to] the public [who] uses these services" if the clinics shut down because they did not have time to comply with the regulations.

The preliminary injunction does not apply to the two other laws being challenged, including an admitting privileges requirement enacted in 2012 and a 48-hour mandatory delay (SB 1222) that takes effect on July 1.

Comments

Scott Tift, an attorney who represents the plaintiffs in the lawsuit, called the injunction "a huge win for women in that neck of the state." According to Tift, women in Bristol seeking an abortion would have to travel more than 100 miles if the city's clinic were to close (Tennessean, 6/26).

Similarly, CRR attorney Stephanie Toti said, "Tennessee women have been granted a temporary reprieve from the tidal wave of clinic shutdown laws sweeping the South" (Reuters, 6/26).


Judge Temporarily Blocks Tenn. Law, Allows Two Abortion Clinics To Stay Open

Mon, 06/29/2015 - 15:44

A federal judge in Nashville on Friday temporarily blocked a Tennessee law (SB 1280) from taking effect this week that would require abortion clinics in the state to be licensed as ambulatory surgical centers, allowing two clinics to remain open, Reuters reports.

Judge Temporarily Blocks Tenn. Law, Allows Two Abortion Clinics To Stay Open

June 29, 2015 — A federal judge in Nashville on Friday temporarily blocked a Tennessee law (SB 1280) from taking effect this week that would require abortion clinics in the state to be licensed as ambulatory surgical centers, allowing two clinics to remain open, Reuters reports (Wisniewski/Bailey, Reuters, 6/26).

U.S. District Judge Kevin Sharp, who granted the preliminary injunction against the law, will decide whether to extend the delay at a July 9 hearing (Wadhwani, Tennessean, 6/26).

Background

The law, which was scheduled to take effect on July 1, will require all facilities or physician offices that perform more than 50 surgical abortions annually to be licensed as ambulatory surgical centers.

Four of the six abortion clinics in the state that provide surgical abortions currently meet the licensing standards, while a fifth provider, in Knoxville, only provides medication abortion and is, therefore, not subject to the requirement. Bristol Regional Women's Center and the Women's Center in Nashville are the two remaining clinics that provide surgical abortions and are not licensed as ambulatory surgical centers.

Lawsuit Details

The Center for Reproductive Rights earlier this month filed a lawsuit against three antiabortion-rights laws, including the ambulatory surgical licensing requirement, in Tennessee on behalf of three abortion clinics and an ob-gyn in the state.

CRR filed suit on behalf of Bristol Regional Women's Center; the Women's Center in Nashville; CHOICES, the Memphis Center for Reproductive Health; and Wesley Adams, an ob-gyn who provides abortion care at the Bristol and Nashville clinics. CRR asked the court to block the ambulatory surgical center requirement while the lawsuit against all three laws continues.

According to lawsuit, the Bristol and Nashville clinics risk closure because they do not meet the ambulatory surgical center standards. The plaintiffs said the state Department of Health blocked their efforts to comply with the law by not making the necessary application available until June 16 and then refusing to process the submitted applications until the clinics also provided renovation plans, finished the renovations and had the renovations pass state inspection. They said the requirements "could not possibly be completed" in the 15-day timespan between the application being made available and July 1, when the law was scheduled to take effect (Women's Health Policy Report, 6/26).

Latest Ruling

Sharp granted a preliminary injunction, ruling in his order that "[i]t is simply not possible to complete this [clinic licensing] process in the time available before the law takes effect" (Reuters, 6/26). He also cited the "harm ... [to] the public [who] uses these services" if the clinics shut down because they did not have time to comply with the regulations.

The preliminary injunction does not apply to the two other laws being challenged, including an admitting privileges requirement enacted in 2012 and a 48-hour mandatory delay (SB 1222) that takes effect on July 1.

Comments

Scott Tift, an attorney who represents the plaintiffs in the lawsuit, called the injunction "a huge win for women in that neck of the state." According to Tift, women in Bristol seeking an abortion would have to travel more than 100 miles if the city's clinic were to close (Tennessean, 6/26).

Similarly, CRR attorney Stephanie Toti said, "Tennessee women have been granted a temporary reprieve from the tidal wave of clinic shutdown laws sweeping the South" (Reuters, 6/26).


Ohio Officials Deny Abortion Clinic's Request for Exemption From Transfer Agreement Rules

Mon, 06/29/2015 - 15:34

The Ohio health director on Thursday denied a request from a local abortion clinic, Women's Med Center in Dayton, for an exemption from the state's transfer agreement requirement, the AP/Seattle Post-Intelligencer reports.

Ohio Officials Deny Abortion Clinic's Request for Exemption From Transfer Agreement Rules

June 29, 2015 — The Ohio health director on Thursday denied a request from a local abortion clinic, Women's Med Center in Dayton, for an exemption from the state's transfer agreement requirement, the AP/Seattle Post-Intelligencer reports (AP/Seattle Post-Intelligencer, 6/26).

Background

Under the state's 2013 budget (HB 59), abortion clinics in the state are required to obtain a transfer agreement with a private hospital. Clinics are prohibited from making such arrangements with public hospitals.

Several clinics have asked the Ohio Department of Health for a variance from the law. Women's Med filed its request two years ago (Women's Health Policy Report, 6/19). According to the AP/Post-Intelligencer, Women's Med said two physicians could provide emergency care for patients (AP/Seattle Post-Intelligencer, 6/26).

Meanwhile, state lawmakers last week approved a compromise budget that includes a provision that would require abortion clinics to arrange a patient transfer agreement with a hospital no more than 30 miles away (Women's Health Policy Report, 6/25). The compromise budget also includes a provision that requires the state health director to grant or deny clinic's variance requests within 60 days (AP/Seattle Post-Intelligencer, 6/26).

The 30-mile patient-transfer provision could affect an abortion clinic in Toledo, Capital Care Network, because it has an agreement with a hospital 50 miles away. Earlier this month, an Ohio judge overturned a 2014 Ohio Department of Health order that would have closed down the clinic because it does not have a transfer agreement with a nearby hospital (Women's Health Policy Report, 6/22).

Decision Details

Ohio Health Director Richard Hodges on Thursday denied Women's Med's request on the grounds that the clinic would not do enough to ensure patient safety.

Hodges said the clinic had 30 days to file a new request. According to the AP/Post-Intelligencer, the clinic could lose its license if it fails to file a new request (AP/Seattle Post-Intelligencer, 6/26).

Editorial Calls on Ohio Gov. To Reject Antiabortion-Rights Budget Provisions

"As they did two years ago, Ohio lawmakers want to use the new state budget to trample on women's constitutional right to safe, legal abortion," a Toledo Blade editorial states.

According to the editorial, if the proposed budget's "medically unsupported anti-abortion provisions become law, they almost certainly would shut down the only clinic that performs abortions in Toledo." The editorial urges Gov. John Kasich (R) to "use his line-item veto to reject these extreme measures," including the budget's transfer-agreement provision.

According to the editorial, "[m]edical authorities overwhelmingly agree that transfer agreements aren't necessary because abortion is one of the safest medical procedures." State lawmakers who oppose abortion rights "know this requirement has no basis in medicine," but they are using it "to shut down abortion clinics across the state," the editorial states.

Further, the editorial notes that state lawmakers are inserting the provision in the state budget to make "irrelevant" a recent court decision to keep the Toledo clinic open. In that decision, a Lucas County judge "argu[ed] that state law is inconsistent with the constitutional right to end an unwanted pregnancy upheld by the U.S. Supreme Court."

Meanwhile, the proposed budget also includes a provision "that would reject requests for variances that permit abortion clinics to stay open if the state does not approve such variances within two months," the editorial continues. According to the editorial, the "new measure could shut down clinics in Dayton and Cincinnati, and make Cincinnati the largest metropolitan area in the country with no abortion provider."

"The governor knows that the General Assembly's anti-abortion extremism is out of step with Ohioans' preferences and with women's constitutional rights," the editorial states. The editorial calls on Kasich to reject the provisions "and affirm women's right to make their own health-care choices" (Toledo Blade, 6/28).